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#5950079 - 07/14/17 01:55 AM Born in the 1800's
rchell Offline
trapper

Registered: 07/30/15
Posts: 270
Loc: South Alabama
I remember my great grand mother who was born in 1884 and died in 1962, I was 9 years old. Any one else remember the old, my great grandmother would not listen to the radio or watch tv, she never cut her hair and it was near her knees when not rolled up and tied.


Edited by rchell (07/14/17 02:14 AM)

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#5950080 - 07/14/17 03:14 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
Caribou Offline
trapper

Registered: 08/29/13
Posts: 54
Loc: AK, Northwest Arctic Borough
My Father in law was born 1903, my wife 1969,(14th of his 15 kids, 5 with his first, 10 with his second wife) his parents were "just getting grey when they had Koksiiniq" (youngest of 5, died in 2007 at 104 years old.)according to an interview with a lady who knew and lived close to my wifes grand parents, and was a best friend to my wifes auntie Aktuk. In the 1910 census they were both given "Christian names" when the Friends Church did the name collecting and counting, and listed as born 1860.


Edited by Caribou (07/14/17 03:15 AM)
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#5950087 - 07/14/17 04:39 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
Sshaffer Offline
trapper

Registered: 05/06/17
Posts: 104
Loc: West Virginia
When I was about 8 in 1965 there was a lady that was about 90 that lived next door to a friend of mine. She had been married to a man who was much older than her who had fought in the civil war.

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#5950135 - 07/14/17 06:43 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
Tweed Offline
trapper

Registered: 12/31/16
Posts: 1719
Loc: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
I only got to meet one great grandparent, my paternel grandfather's mother. She was born in 1890, near Commerce, GA (along with most of that side if the family) but moved to Abbeville SC before my grandfather was born.

Even as a kid I thought it was so cool to have a speak with a link to the previous century.

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#5950138 - 07/14/17 06:44 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
tomahawker Offline
trapper

Registered: 05/09/09
Posts: 1060
Loc: ohio
Great grandpa born in 98. Lots of stories farming with horses.
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#5950139 - 07/14/17 06:45 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: Caribou]
Tweed Offline
trapper

Registered: 12/31/16
Posts: 1719
Loc: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Originally Posted By: Caribou
My Father in law was born 1903, my wife 1969,(14th of his 15 kids, 5 with his first, 10 with his second wife) his parents were "just getting grey when they had Koksiiniq" (youngest of 5, died in 2007 at 104 years old.)according to an interview with a lady who knew and lived close to my wifes grand parents, and was a best friend to my wifes auntie Aktuk. In the 1910 census they were both given "Christian names" when the Friends Church did the name collecting and counting, and listed as born 1860.


Is your FIL still alive? Have a copy or a link to that article.

I can barely imagine living till 60 up there but 100....WOW!

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#5950144 - 07/14/17 06:58 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
harleydparts Offline
trapper

Registered: 04/16/13
Posts: 1259
Loc: east TN, USA
My grandmother was born in 1896, passed on in 2001, her mind was strong till about the last six months of her life. My grandfather was born in 1900 and passed on in 1989, strong mind till the end. The stories of every day life were fascinating. Of course in about 30 years my grandchildren are going to be telling their friends 'My papaw was born in 1959, the stories of every day life were fascinating '.
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#5950149 - 07/14/17 07:06 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
Jonesie Offline
trapper

Registered: 08/08/07
Posts: 740
Loc: Monroeville NJ
My grandfather on my dads side was born in WV 1898 moved to Oklahoma in I think 1908/09. My grandfather on my mothers side was born in NJ 1907. Both quit school in the 8th grade to provide for the family. Both was men that could do anything. They could sit down a figure things out, think on things and come up with solutions, Both was hard tough men, yet both was very loving (unless they got made LOL) and Both very humble. Both was always willing to teach me and both told great stories of the early days. I think most of it was true LOL Most of my hunting and trapping foundation based on habits and behaviors came from these 2 man. Although most of the methods they used then would not be approved of today LOL
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#5950166 - 07/14/17 07:30 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
Michigan Trappin Offline
trapper

Registered: 05/20/14
Posts: 3245
Loc: MI
My grandfather was born in Poland and immigrated on his own at 14 years old to usa Chicago. Stories of running alcohol during probation as well as bring of all things, eggs into Chicago (mafia controlled eggs in to Chicago) that was a differnt time Funny how things once were. His wife, my grandmother, was born in Chicago but had returned to Serbia as a child, told me stories of WWI and about the "luftfisch" that were dangerous and deadly. Airplanes

I miss hearing their stories, another story my grandfather told me was that while digging marrow with a crane, he was told to "immediately bury" the large bones that would sometimes be found in the marrow. He said some where very large

Running booze in southern Wisconsin during proabition got pulled over by sheriff and proceeded to get drunk with him

Grandma had a great fear of water because on her return trip from Bosnia to USA her sister died on the ship, burial at sea was the norm. Sharks followed the ships and she witnessed them devouring her sister when she was dropped in to the ocean

I found a 1931 census on the internet when the internet first came out (before advertisers and big companies controlled the search engines) it was from 1931. Cook county Illinois it revealed things about them that confirmed some of their stories

I really wish I had spent more time asking about the past, for the last three years of my grandfathers life we fished together almost every Wednesday night He was 93 when he died He had his 5th open heart surgery and I visited him in the hospital, he told me he missed grandma (she had died 8 months earlier). I told him " well I always told you that you were to stubborn to die, until you decided it was time" so I said " grampa you go ahead and go see grandma, I will see you again in a few years" he died the next day in his sleep.
I miss that guy
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#5950195 - 07/14/17 08:08 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
seniortrap Offline
trapper

Registered: 05/25/12
Posts: 3136
Loc: michigan,USA
My late wife's grandma and grandpa both born in 1885. Grandpa worked on the railroad when he was a 13 year old boy.
He worked the woods as a skidder for $1.00 a day. He had to send the money home. When he got married, Grandma said that's not happening anymore.
Later he worked for Henry Ford in the engine department for model T's. He passed in 1976.

Grandma raised 3 children (one was killed along with a friend by a trolley car) in Detroit. She worked over 60 different jobs in her life.
As a very young girl the family left a farm in the lower part of the state by way of buckboard. When crossing a river, they lost a brother.
She lived to be 102. The last two years was bad after a stroke.

The stories they could tell.
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"Chaotic action is preferable to orderly inaction."
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#5950205 - 07/14/17 08:29 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
TurkeyTime Offline
trapper

Registered: 01/21/14
Posts: 613
Loc: NW MO
There was a story in our rural electric magazine a couple of months ago about a brother and sister here in MO whose Dad had fought in the Civil War. I believe they are in their 80's. Their Dad was young and joined the war at the end. Married a lady when he was in 60's and she her early 20's so the numbers made it what it is.

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#5950209 - 07/14/17 08:34 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
T-Rex Offline


Registered: 12/24/06
Posts: 4597
Loc: MN >>>
My father was born in 1893. He died when I was 8 years old, so I really wasn't old enough to distinguish his characteristics from those of younger guys.
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Man who mistake shillelagh for fairy wand; see pixie dust, also.

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#5950214 - 07/14/17 08:45 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
tjm Offline
trapper

Registered: 11/11/11
Posts: 6639
Loc: SWMo.
All my grand parents were born in the 1800s, I knew 3 of them and quite a few great uncles and and aunts as well as others in their age groups. Of course the stories were often about people they had known in their youth. Mothers paternal grandfather was with Sherman in Georgia and she had many tales about him. Dads paternal grandfather was involved in many of the Civil War battles in Mo. and Ar. and there were stories that he had told that I heard second hand.

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#5950254 - 07/14/17 09:29 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
tomahawker Offline
trapper

Registered: 05/09/09
Posts: 1060
Loc: ohio


Edited by tomahawker (07/14/17 09:31 AM)
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#5950260 - 07/14/17 09:37 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: tjm]
Muskrat Offline
trapper

Registered: 12/23/06
Posts: 3175
Loc: Southwestern Wisconsin
When I was a teenager in the 60s living on the river, an "older couple" lived next door. Walt and Ruth Hanson. They were in their 80s. Walt enjoyed telling stories of his boyhood days and in later years watching Lake Onalaska fill up as the dams were being constructed on the Mississippi River. He knew where to fish on that lake as he knew the valleys, road ditches, and hills that were now submerged. When I left for the military in 1970 I never saw them again. But the stories Walt told stuck with me forever.

I shared many of those stories with my students over the years, especially during the aquatics unit, talking about lake aging, and how Lake Onalaska was aging and how I knew this old fella who had witnessed the birth of the lake. I'll never forget the looks on the faces of the kids when I had them do the math to determine what year they were born in.

After the year 2000 it dawned on me the kids I had in class now were all born in the 1900s, and how that might be of significance one day. As I shared the stories over the years 'til retirement in 2010 I would wait for the looks of amazement and then tell them something that really set them back. I said to them . . . if you all live to be "old people", whatever age that means to you, there will come a day when some little boy or girl will find out you were born in the 1900s and then you too will witness the look of amazement on their faces. And you could see that sink in, some more, some less, but they all understood.

Now that I substitute teach mostly in the dead of winter I've shared the story less and less. And now that it's 2017, going on 2018 next graduation date, I'm afraid last year's seniors will be the last class that has more than a few students who were born in 1999. Probably this year none.

And so it goes, eh?

My brother and I worked the typical lawn mowing jobs, but we also ran 800 hooks a day setlining in the summer and trapped in the winter. Fortunately for me there were a couple of older fellas in the area that didn't mind sharing knowledge and techniques. Few they were, as most of 'em didn't share a thing. But the few that did were heroes in my mind, and I watched, listened, learned, implemented, and modified.

I happened to run into the daughter of one of these fellas just this year at the nursing home where Dad resided. She's a volunteer there, and is in her early 70s. We were having coffee and she happened to come in and Mom shared that she had grown up on Brice Prairie. I asked her what her last name was, she shared, and I said Arnie must have been your father. The look on her face was one of disbelief. She said hardly anyone knew of Arnie, and I was one of very few who remembered him at all.

Then I shared the story of Arnie with her, and how this wiry old man was definitely one of my top five heroes in life. Every morning he'd drive that old pickup truck down to the boat landing where he kept this old wooden boat, loaded it with tubs and setline boxes, and rowed out to retrieve his lines on the lake. Couldn't afford an outboard motor, but rowed everywhere on that lake and back sloughs coming in off the Black. Arnie was the only setliner who was patient with me. Shared his knowledge about where the clam beds were to secure bait, how to rig the trotline, and where to set at different times of the season.

His method of rowing is one I picked up and continue to this day. Alternating the oar swing, instead of pulling back on both at the same time, was his technique. And I adopted it, as Dad wouldn't let me use the 9 horse Johnson 'til I was 12. I rowed all over that lake too.

By the time I was finished with the Arnie stories she was visibly moved. She said no one ever told her stories like that. Of course she remembered her father being the fisherman and trapper, but had no idea of him sharing with anyone and the aftereffects.

I treasure the memories of the few "old guys" that took the time to teach me what I needed to know to get started and refine the techniques. I also vividly recall the "old guys" that wouldn't let me near their fur sheds, but that was okay too, as I represented competition, and competition meant less money in their pocket.

It was the faceless ones that educated me on the other side. Those who snapped my traps, stole my traps or cut my setlines or stole our catch, the ones that taught me early in life that there will always be these sorry excuses for humanity, as my father used to collectively classify them.

Appreciate the older ones. They've been there, done that, for the most part. Long before the internet, long before VHS tapes, these fellas learned mostly through trial and error. If you've got one nearby, be patient, listen to the stories. There's gold in there somewhere. Hopefully you'll recognize it when it comes by.
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Lifetime member NTA and WTA.

We can hoop your beaver mountain man style!

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#5950265 - 07/14/17 09:41 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: tomahawker]
Tweed Offline
trapper

Registered: 12/31/16
Posts: 1719
Loc: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Originally Posted By: tomahawker


Thanks for posting that. Even in the mid-50s was sure a different time. I get the show was hosted by Winston but still got a chuckle out of 96 year old Seymour who could barely walk, being given a can of pipe tobacco as a thank you.

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#5950271 - 07/14/17 09:44 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
beaverpeeler Offline
trapper

Registered: 12/23/06
Posts: 2941
Loc: Oregon
My grandfather Teodor was born in Stockholm, Sweden in 1882 and immigrated to the US when he was 19. He promised his friends he would be back as soon as he had made a fortune. In 1938 my dad (born 1910) went to Sweden and knocked on the door of Teddy's best friend. With tears in his eyes Pers told my dad: "Teodor! You aways said you would come back....and you did! You haven't changed a bit!"
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Yesterday our heritage, tomorrow our legacy�today our responsibility.

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#5950312 - 07/14/17 10:53 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
Boco Offline
trapper

Registered: 08/08/11
Posts: 13637
Loc: james bay frontierOnt.
Not much history on this side of the pond compared to the old country.I have pictures of my grandparents on my dads side at their wedding in the early 1900's,on the farm.The farmhouse I visited when I was young was over 300 years old with relatives still living there.Many old farmhouses,pubs etc there over 300 years old with people still living there.The nearby town of Monasterevin has been there since the 7th century.I visited a pub on the north shore of Jersey in the channel islands that was over 1000 years old,the big stone blocks where people walked down into the pub had grooves worn in them from the foot traffic.The large oak slab was the original bar.

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#5950336 - 07/14/17 11:37 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
Larry Baer Offline
trapper

Registered: 08/22/11
Posts: 626
Loc: Peoria County Illinois
My grandpa was born in 1885 in Loysville PA. north of Carlisle PA. He trapped and hunted the Susquehanna valley and Sherman's creek that runs into it. I have a picture of my Great Grandpa with a bunch of rats on the back of a wagon around 1900. He hunted until about 1968. He said he never liked trapping because his dad always made him pick up the rats out of the water. When he was a kid he and his two brothers would go out and pick up chestnuts and then when they had a wagon full he would ride with his Dad to Harris burg and they would trade for oyster for Thanksgiving. They hunted for their food - it was not like now. They had a spring house with pork, eels and fish preserved in it and they hung salted pork in the eves of the house in the attic. My Dad said he stayed in their house when he was a kid around 1939 and they had a walnut tree that dropped it's nuts all night long on the tin roof that kept him awake. My grandpa lived to be 102 and died in 1987 at home where he lived with us.

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#5950343 - 07/14/17 11:52 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
Tweed Offline
trapper

Registered: 12/31/16
Posts: 1719
Loc: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Larry Baer- I read a great little book this past winter called "Fifty Years a Hunter and Trapper" by Eldred Nathaniel Woodcock. Its a biography of a guy that trapped in PA from around the civil war through the turn of the century. Its FREE on Amazon for download. Sounds like your grandfather might've walked the same tracts as that guy.

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#5950364 - 07/14/17 12:27 PM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
Aaron Proffitt Offline
trapper

Registered: 10/14/07
Posts: 5895
Loc: OK
My great grandmother was born in 1899 or maybe a hair earlier . Wonderful woman . I've never seen my Dad mourn the way he did when she passed away .


Off topic , but in a similar way, I'll absolutely grieve when my wife's grandfather passes away . I love that man as if he were my own grandfather. During my wedding reception , him and my uncle ( another great man who has terminal cancer ,recently diagnosed )spent hours talking .

I watched them in a kind of awe . Two old warriors , I'll only know them as gentle father figures , conversing and showing mutual respect for the other.
_________________________
To avoid germs while performing mouth to mouth resuscitation...use a harmonica !!

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#5950366 - 07/14/17 12:34 PM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
Aaron Proffitt Offline
trapper

Registered: 10/14/07
Posts: 5895
Loc: OK
To add , my Uncle Roland once came out duck hunting with me . We shot a few ducks and geese , but he really just enjoyed watching my dog work . I'll never forget him saying ," Nephew , I could just sit here all day and just watch your dog do his thing ."


No better praise.
_________________________
To avoid germs while performing mouth to mouth resuscitation...use a harmonica !!

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#5950386 - 07/14/17 01:16 PM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: tjm]
tjm Offline
trapper

Registered: 11/11/11
Posts: 6639
Loc: SWMo.
Originally Posted By: tjm
All my grand parents were born in the 1800s, I knew 3 of them and quite a few great uncles and and aunts as well as others in their age groups. Of course the stories were often about people they had known in their youth. Mothers paternal grandfather was with Sherman in Georgia and she had many tales about him. Dads paternal grandfather was involved in many of the Civil War battles in Mo. and Ar. and there were stories that he had told that I heard second hand.
Just realized that with Mom being the 'baby' all her siblings would have been born in the 1800s also, and their spouses.

kinda wish this hadn't come up now I'm feeling old.

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#5950404 - 07/14/17 01:46 PM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
J.Morse Offline
trapper

Registered: 05/31/13
Posts: 2709
Loc: Northern Michigan
My maternal Gr. Gr. Grandad was born over in Canada in 1819. That was before Canada was even a country. I never knew him because he died before I was born. I did, however, know one of his boys....my Gr. Grandad, who was born in 1872 when his father was 53 years old. That guy made it into his mid nineties, as did his wife. I remember both well. I never got to sit down and talk much with either, although I did a little with my Gr. Grandma. He and she were very hard workers and their farm was run with cool efficiency. They had the usual barns and outbuildings associated with area farms, but also had a good root cellar, which was common, and an ice house, which was not near as common, but hardly unheard-of My mother said that both her grand parents were also full of pee and vinegar, especially the old man, who all the kids loved and flocked around because he kept them in a constant state of either excitement or mischief! One of his favorite deals was giving pennies to any of the grandbabies that would run up to their adult womenfolk and run their fingers up under the hem of the women's dresses, quickly lift and yell Zzzzzzip! while doing it. Both my Gr. Grandparents were in the Pineries of Northern Michigan during the heydays of White Pine logging, and while Eastern Elk, Moose, and Cougars were still to be found in the Lower Peninsula, and Caribou were still in parts of the Upper Peninsula. Although Caribou hung on until after my mother was born 100 years ago tomorrow, the Moose and Elk had been shot off in the Lower Peninsula by the turn of the century. It is hard to fathom just how fast this landscape changed. The county I live in was a road-less wilderness until after the Civil War. 30 years later it was nearly all cut-over land that was either left to revert back to forest, or turned to the plow. The vast majority of this county was poorly soiled so it reverted to forest because when the farms failed the land was lost to back taxes because it was thought to be worthless by people that made an agrarian living. Even in my Grandad's day there was the thought that a farm that was 1/4 lake or swamp, was a farm that was 1/4 useless land. My Grandad bought a bunch of land during the Depression for $1.00 per acre. He ended up loosing the majority of it before WW2 because he couldn't turn enough of a profit on it to pay the taxes. His best money-making deal was a brief stint as a moonshiner/bootlegger in the mid 1930's, but that ended in failure because of his propensity to drink up the profits. My Grandmother, fed up with his debauchery, ended the corn cooking by dumping kerosene into his mash. I don't know what became of the still, but I assume it went back to the sheriff that gave it to him in the first place. I was lucky enough to sit my Grandad down and record some of his stories when I was a young fellow. I cherish the recording as the family heirloom it is. The old cassette tape is degraded to the point that I am afraid to play it now, but I hope to someday have it transferred to a digital format. I personally have kept a journal/diary most of my adult life. I have decades worth of writings recorded. I'd like to think that 100 years from now my descendants will think they are cool reading. I hope there will still be some licensed hunters and trappers in the gang then.


Edited by J.Morse (07/14/17 01:50 PM)
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#5950416 - 07/14/17 02:01 PM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
J.Morse Offline
trapper

Registered: 05/31/13
Posts: 2709
Loc: Northern Michigan
After writing the above post, it has dawned on me that today would have been my Great Grandfather's birthday...his 145th!
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#5951072 - 07/15/17 10:04 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: J.Morse]
Zim Offline
trapper

Registered: 12/27/06
Posts: 3085
Loc: Rock Springs, WI
My grandfather on my mother's side was born in 1893 and my grandmother in 1895. I have both their very ornate confirmation certificates from the church, both written entirely in German although they were both born here in Wisconsin. My grandmothers maiden name was Schmidt and later her family changed it to Smith so folks would not think they were German. I'd like to know the story behind that one.

Zim

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#5951135 - 07/15/17 11:58 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: Zim]
swift4me Offline
trapper

Registered: 07/13/10
Posts: 1388
Loc: American In the Pyrenees; Fran...
My dad's mother was born in 1894 in Brainerd, Minnesota as an illegitimate child. As I understand it her biological father was a minister in Brainerd at the time. I've seen her handwritten birth certificate several times. She was sent off to a cousin's family and she took their name, Engbretsen. They shipped her off to Fargo at the age of 14 where she got a job as a secretary with Northern Pacific in the freight office.

She met my grandfather, born in 1889 in Sydney Montana, in 1922 when her and some friends from Fargo took a road trip to see Yellowstone Park. I have a copy of her 5 page typed journal of the trip. On the last page of the journal she tells of the group stopping at someone's relative's house in Sydney. The last line in her writing was, "... and today I met a wonderful man named George Woolley..." My grandfather.

She was a tough little gal and after working and raising two sons in Bozeman, Montana, she lived in Peru and Equador for twenty years when my grandfather was sent there by the Department of Agriculture to work on mosquito eradication.

Pete

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#5951189 - 07/15/17 01:20 PM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
lee steinmeyer Offline
trapper

Registered: 10/28/11
Posts: 6165
Loc: Wheaton Ks
Great write ups guys, and I especially enjoyed muskrats story of Arnie!

My dad was born in 1901 and he lived a full life. Died in 96, at 96 years old. His mother, my grandma, died at 97 in about 1957. She used to tell storys about the Indians coming to the house to beg for food, and she would hide in her mothers skirts and peek out at them. Mom and dad would go over to grampa and gmaws, and set around all night talking and playing cards, and never speak any english. It was unpopular after the war and Hitler to be German, so it was contained to their house! They wouldn't teach me any German on a bet, but later after gpaw died, she did teach me enough to count! whoopee! My dad was an inspiration to me in many ways, but came through the horse and buggy days, cut wood with only and axe and crosscut saw, and saw men walk on the moon! I won't tell you what he thought about that!
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#5951260 - 07/15/17 03:29 PM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
Osky Offline
trapper

Registered: 12/09/13
Posts: 4525
Loc: Northern MN
Lee that strikes a cord. My mothers mother was born on the plains in western Minnesota in 1889, sod house of which I have a picture.
She too said that Indians would travel by from time to time and her mother always had extra potatoes canned up as they would beg for food. She said the Bucks never came in, just the squaws and children. Her mother would give the food and the squaws would insist on giving back, often stripping down and giving their clothing as they had nothing else. Once the Indians were out of site her mother would burn the clothing as it was full of lice and fleas.
She told me many stories in the late 70's and early 80's before she passed. Often while her television was on and there were hi lights of NASA activities, moon, shuttle etc. always amazed and still does amaze me that her time on earth went from horseback to outer space.
My fathers father was also a breed who spoke very little English. No one knows from whence he came other than a western tribe and a white? Ended up as a younger man in the northern MN logging camps met my grandma who had come west with her father from back east. Her father had gotten black lung from the mines there and a homestead here was his companies settlement.
After marrying my grandmother my grandfather discovered whiskey the rest of their lives was not real pretty.
Osky
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#5951261 - 07/15/17 03:34 PM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
J.Morse Offline
trapper

Registered: 05/31/13
Posts: 2709
Loc: Northern Michigan
Keep these stories a'comin, they are very, very interesting.
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#5951306 - 07/15/17 04:26 PM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: J.Morse]
Cedar Hacker Offline
trapper

Registered: 12/23/06
Posts: 353
Loc: Texas Hill Country
My grand parents were born in the 1870's and 1880's.
Some of the stories were good and some were bad.
One thing is for certain, it was a different world back in those days.
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If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple of payments.


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#5952192 - 07/16/17 08:34 PM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
beaverpeeler Offline
trapper

Registered: 12/23/06
Posts: 2941
Loc: Oregon
My mother's father was a wagon maker by trade near Mitchell, South Dakota. In 1917 he made a conestoga wagon for his family and moved them out to indian country in Buffalo county South Dakota. Mom remembers Indians coming to their house and "visiting" for a while and getting fed by my grandma. One day one of the indians who liked my grandfather gave him an epaulette from a cavalry uniform that he said had come from the battle of the Little Big Horn. We still have it and have always believed it was from Custer's dress uniform.
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Yesterday our heritage, tomorrow our legacy�today our responsibility.

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#5952217 - 07/16/17 09:08 PM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
stinkypete Offline
trapper

Registered: 04/19/10
Posts: 1699
Loc: Ohio
I lived on a mink ranch owned by a guy named Vern. Very hard working man. Vern was 73 this was back in 1987. He use to tell me stories of his grandfather. They came from Europe. Travel from the eastern US by train thru the Dakotas. The train was delayed in the Dakotas for a day and a half waiting for the buffalo to cross the tracks. That always was amazing to me.

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#5952278 - 07/16/17 10:00 PM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
rpmartin Offline
trapper

Registered: 04/03/14
Posts: 277
Loc: Ellenboro Wisconsin
Only person I new that was born in the 1 800s was my grandfather, he was in the first world War and and told me stories of having his leg run over by a tank. That injury cost him his leg later in life.

Not good at links but found a website called findagrave.com . Check it out. I found several relatives. A couple g-g grandfather's in the civil war and 1 g-g-g-g-grandfather who was in the revaluationary war and faught at Bunker hill. Will try to post a link but I am a computer wimp. Lol
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NRA, NTA, RMEF, Pheasants Forever.
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#5952324 - 07/16/17 10:57 PM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
Actor Offline
trapper

Registered: 09/11/08
Posts: 4031
Loc: Newark, Ohio 76 years
Marvelous ... the host of the show "What's My Line", Garry Moore is my namesake .... My mother always liked him on the radio and she liked his name, so when I came on the scene, that is what she named me ...

Garry-
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Don't pick a fight with an old man. If he is too old to fight, he'll just kill you.

Have been trapping 70 years - Member: NTA, OSTA,& OWO

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#5952384 - 07/17/17 06:34 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
Trapper Dahlgren Offline
trapper

Registered: 06/15/16
Posts: 1079
Loc: Michigan
my great grandma was born in 1868 she was part Indian she had 5 husbands over her live time.in between husband she was a lady of the night tough woman always poor . grandmother was born in poor house don't know how many brother an sister she had because they where put up for adoption great grandma live till 1970 I think .grandfather was born 1903 was a great man I stay with them in summer time to help on farm they raised 9 kids an never took anything from anyone [hand out] some of my best time was with them an cousins on grandma farm

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#5952435 - 07/17/17 07:57 AM Re: Born in the 1800's [Re: rchell]
lcd Offline
trapper

Registered: 07/29/13
Posts: 127
Loc: TN
Both my Grandpa's were born around 1850. I remember as a boy my Mon talking about how hard life was for her young teenage Dad during the time of the Civil War. Troops from the North and South occupied all the area around and took most of the food that the citizens had put up for their own use. War is not a pretty sight when it is on your own doorstep.

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