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Are Canines Left Footed? #6659935
11/07/19 08:13 PM
11/07/19 08:13 PM
Joined: Dec 2014
Posts: 1,073
MN
Y
yukonal Offline OP
trapper
yukonal  Offline OP
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MN
Every fox and coyote I caught this year was by the right front foot(except for one). Even when setting for a left front foot catch. I'm thinking they just want to stand on their right, dig with their left foot. shocked

Have you guys noticed any tendencies?

Re: Are Canines Left Footed? [Re: yukonal] #6659975
11/07/19 08:59 PM
11/07/19 08:59 PM
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 14,955
williamsburg ks
D
danny clifton Offline
trapper
danny clifton  Offline
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D

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Posts: 14,955
williamsburg ks
[Linked Image]

im not sure about this one


ban gun free zones
Re: Are Canines Left Footed? [Re: yukonal] #6660065
11/07/19 11:01 PM
11/07/19 11:01 PM
Joined: Dec 2014
Posts: 1,073
MN
Y
yukonal Offline OP
trapper
yukonal  Offline OP
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MN
Getting ready to dig with the left. laugh

Re: Are Canines Left Footed? [Re: yukonal] #6660077
11/07/19 11:21 PM
11/07/19 11:21 PM
Joined: Feb 2018
Posts: 2,403
Sagle, ID
Wild_Idaho Offline
trapper
Wild_Idaho  Offline
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Posts: 2,403
Sagle, ID
I've had 50/50 left vs. right paw on coyotes in dirt holes this year (4 total coyotes). Coons on the other hand I believe are mostly left handed. As of the 10 coons I've caught in DPs this year, 7 were left paw, 2 right paw and one both paws.

Last edited by Wild_Idaho; 11/07/19 11:21 PM.

Real name = Eric
The sharpest hammer in the box of crayons.

Re: Are Canines Left Footed? [Re: yukonal] #6660112
11/08/19 01:18 AM
11/08/19 01:18 AM
Joined: May 2009
Posts: 5,618
Champaign County, Ohio.
K
KeithC Online content
trapper
KeithC  Online Content
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K

Joined: May 2009
Posts: 5,618
Champaign County, Ohio.
I think most of what determines which foot is caught comes from how the trapper makes their set. Hand dominance of the trapper could definitely effect how they build their set.

Keith

Re: Are Canines Left Footed? [Re: yukonal] #6660184
11/08/19 06:47 AM
11/08/19 06:47 AM
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 4,443
Port Republic South Jersey
N
Newt Offline
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Newt  Offline
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Posts: 4,443
Port Republic South Jersey
My dog is left footed


Many have followed my tracks
Aint been no one that could fill my shoes
NEWT -----------------OVER----------------









www.snareone.com
Re: Are Canines Left Footed? [Re: Newt] #6660241
11/08/19 08:10 AM
11/08/19 08:10 AM
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 5,265
Central Pennsylvania
Nittany Lion Offline
Don't call me Mister, Mister
Nittany Lion  Offline
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Central Pennsylvania
Originally Posted by Newt
My dog is left footed
That would be a Southpaw.


I want to grow my own food but I can't find bacon seeds.
Re: Are Canines Left Footed? [Re: yukonal] #6660257
11/08/19 08:25 AM
11/08/19 08:25 AM
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 27,889
McGrath, AK
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white17 Offline

"General (Mr.Sunshine) Washington"
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McGrath, AK
I absolutely believe that animals have a preference for one foot over the other.

For many years I kept written records on marten catches. If memory serves..............close to 78-80 % were caught by a left front. Different set types also.

But IMO that raises this question.

Is the critter standing on his dominant foot or is his other foot the dominant one, and he plans to use that to access the bait ?


Mean As Nails
Re: Are Canines Left Footed? [Re: yukonal] #6660264
11/08/19 08:33 AM
11/08/19 08:33 AM
Joined: Aug 2017
Posts: 596
La Vernia & Dallas TX
Mark June Offline
trapper
Mark June  Offline
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La Vernia & Dallas TX
I also catch most canines by the right paw, but then I'm right dominant and set my trap offset to the right slightly. Perhaps this makes a difference. My pan is closer to the right paw as they approach with a full body commit into the setup. Hmm...


Dallas Theological Seminary Class of 2023
https://www.markjuneslures.com/
Professional Predator Trapping Academy Host



Re: Are Canines Left Footed? [Re: yukonal] #6660299
11/08/19 09:08 AM
11/08/19 09:08 AM
Joined: Dec 2014
Posts: 1,073
MN
Y
yukonal Offline OP
trapper
yukonal  Offline OP
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Posts: 1,073
MN
Originally Posted by yukonal
Even when setting for a left front foot catch. I'm thinking they just want to stand on their right, dig with their left foot. shocked


I always offset to the left. That should have them standing on their left, digging with their right...in theory. And I still center the trap down wind, so for sure, the trap is left. Still...catches on the right front. Weird.

Got me thinking, wonder if I could up my odds by offsetting to the right? Hmmm.
blush

Re: Are Canines Left Footed? [Re: yukonal] #6660304
11/08/19 09:17 AM
11/08/19 09:17 AM
Joined: Jan 2009
Posts: 874
Idaho, Lemhi County
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Gulo Offline
"On The Other Hand"
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Idaho, Lemhi County
I have been extremely interested in this subject for a couple of decades. I could write a book on handedness in wolves (and, along with other wolf minutiae, am in the process of doing so), but here, will try to condense my findings and opinions.

Handedness is evident in all mammals that have been studied. Like humans, most canines are right-handed. Take your dog and make him sit at the base of a stairway. Place yourself at the head of the stairway and call the dog. They will invariably start up the stairs with their dominant paw. Also, the dominant-side paw has nails (claws) that are worn down at a faster rate than the claws on the non-dominant paw. In wolves, I've been measuring claw length with a set of very precise calipers for years on both live and dead wolves. About 76% of the time, the right side (fronts) has marginally shorter claws than the left. But, like humans, the dominant-side claws grow faster to compensate for this uneven wear and tear. However, on my two current dogs, they are both right-handed, and their right claws are marginally shorter, so I've assumed in dogs and wolves, that the uneven growth is not sufficient to maintain claw length equal to the subdominant side. If you really get into the science literature, there is even evidence that handedness in dogs has a sexual bias as well. But I'm not going into that (yet).

As trappers, how can we use this information (if you do indeed believe these data)? At a dirt-hole set, where we can highly control where the foot is placed, I believe it is very important. Not so important on a flat set, a blind set, or a pee-post set, as they are made with less precision, and we are not controlling the situation to the same degree as at a dirt/snow hole set. In watching wild wolves on remote video cameras, I've been able to watch them a few times getting caught at dirtholes. I place the trap about 2 inches off-center to the left in front of the hole. It appears to me that the final "committed" step by a wolf is on their sub-dominant side, thus giving them the use of their dominant front paw to dig at the hole. At a dirt-hole set, I catch 90+% of wolves by their left front foot. Is it because I offset to the left? I think that, yes, partially. Any time that I can increase my chances of a wolf catch, even by a tiny percentage, I'm going to take that advantage. I have absolutely no doubt that this does indeed increase my catch rate, and I will continue to use it until I learn otherwise. Too, I assume that this thought process works for coyotes as well as wolves, although I don't have the precise data on coyotes that I've gathered on wolves.

Jack

Re: Are Canines Left Footed? [Re: yukonal] #6660308
11/08/19 09:21 AM
11/08/19 09:21 AM
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,009
KS
T
TurTLe Offline
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When making dirthole sets, I always set center and tight to the hole. Never really paid attention to what foot was caught as long as they were in the trap. It's the ones you miss that give you the education anyways. My opinion of course.


Lifetime Member of the NTA, FTA, Kansas Furharvesters,and the Arizona Trappers Association.





Re: Are Canines Left Footed? [Re: yukonal] #6660311
11/08/19 09:25 AM
11/08/19 09:25 AM
Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 13,276
Eastern Shore of Maryland
HobbieTrapper Offline
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Eastern Shore of Maryland
Major Boddicker completed a study that resulted in a “most effective set” that included traps at the set. The increase in catch was 30% vs a single trap. While it doesn’t specifically state that result is due to “favored foot” I would think that is part of it.

Does your dog randomly lift a leg to pee or does it position itself so it pees from one side most of the time?

Last edited by HobbieTrapper; 11/08/19 09:27 AM.

"Forgiveness".......because there is no Time Machine.

-Goofy-
Re: Are Canines Left Footed? [Re: Gulo] #6660319
11/08/19 09:36 AM
11/08/19 09:36 AM
Joined: Dec 2014
Posts: 1,073
MN
Y
yukonal Offline OP
trapper
yukonal  Offline OP
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MN
[quote=Gulo.

Handedness is evident in all mammals that have been studied. Like humans, most canines are right-handed. .

At a dirt-hole set, where we can highly control where the foot is placed, I believe it is very important. Not so important on a flat set, a blind set, or a pee-post set, as they are made with less precision, and we are not controlling the situation to the same degree as at a dirt/snow hole set.. Jack [/quote]

That's always been my assumption, too. That's why I always offset to the left. Don't know what's going on this year with the right front catches.

Bunch of south-paws rolled in on me.
laugh

Re: Are Canines Left Footed? [Re: yukonal] #6660329
11/08/19 09:43 AM
11/08/19 09:43 AM
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 731
South Texas Brush Country
TEJAS Offline
trapper
TEJAS  Offline
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Posts: 731
South Texas Brush Country

Great question Yukonal!

Thanks for chiming in Mr. Whitman.

I remember your posts on “Coyote Handedness”.

This subject is of great interest to me as well.


I’ve kept detailed records of all my coyote catches for the last few seasons.

This includes foot catches broken down into adult male and female, juvenile, and pup categories.

Since almost all of my problem child coyotes tend to be adult females, I wanted to see if they had an overall foot preference different from the males. They were my main focus.

All sets had an 8” spacing with no offset in an attempt to determine foot preference without targeting a specific side.

I look at these catch stats more from a set approach, positioning, or working standpoint rather than a digging aspect whether it be flats, posts, or hole sets.

My goal is have them step on the pan well before they think about digging.

I often times go on a run of left or right foot catches, but the numbers always tend to even out in the end.

One specific variation of a dirt hole set has taken multiple double front foot catches.

Of the 140-50 coyotes recorded, the right vs. left foot catch ratio between adult male and female was almost dead even.

The same stat held true for all groups separate and combined.


Re: Are Canines Left Footed? [Re: yukonal] #6660480
11/08/19 01:06 PM
11/08/19 01:06 PM
Joined: Mar 2011
Posts: 5,868
Montana ,Rocky Mtns.
Sharon Online content
"American Honey"
Sharon  Online Content
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Joined: Mar 2011
Posts: 5,868
Montana ,Rocky Mtns.
Love these observations and discussions , every time.

As an example, in experience with horses, they, as most all other four footed animals also have either right or left handed dominance . They are worked with , becoming refined in both right and left hand transitions as training progresses . A few are gifted athletes right off the bat, being ambidextrous , and developing their movement is smooth and natural.

For art purposes, and sheer enjoyment of observing animals in slow motion video footage, that left or right dominance is seen at a lope.

In horseman terms, called flying lead changes.

Depending on which turn they execute, they will begin or switch to either a left lead or right lead. All four feet switch in a run as they change direction in turns. Hence, the three beat gait seen in tracks . The easiest way to tell is the front leg that reaches out farthest , dictates what lead they are in at the time.

Most all use right and left leads in a run, from horses to wolverine, canines , rhino , hyenas, even camels if they are pushed hard enough. Elephants go at a fast "trot", as their run.

Flying lead changes are essential to keep balanced momentum in tight axis turns . It is a thing of beauty to see many animals in slow motion video moving at speed. Keen observation also reveals the intent of direction , even before the body begins to lean the opposite way in lead change , seen in ear direction switches, following eye focus. Ears and eyes are connected in the thought process signaling the body which way to run.

Being pre disposed to right or left handed plays a large part in that process whenever the terrain allows.


Even in non target animals, knowing how they move and how the terrain can change that movement, possibly keeping them from bumbling into a set, is helpful.


Thank you , Jack, always, for explaining your studies of a lifetime to share . A subject easily enjoyed for hours in discussions .






Re: Are Canines Left Footed? [Re: Gulo] #6660495
11/08/19 01:36 PM
11/08/19 01:36 PM
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 27,889
McGrath, AK
W
white17 Offline

"General (Mr.Sunshine) Washington"
white17  Offline

"General (Mr.Sunshine) Washington"
W

Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 27,889
McGrath, AK
Originally Posted by Gulo
I have been extremely interested in this subject for a couple of decades. I could write a book on handedness in wolves (and, along with other wolf minutiae, am in the process of doing so), but here, will try to condense my findings and opinions.

Handedness is evident in all mammals that have been studied. Like humans, most canines are right-handed. Take your dog and make him sit at the base of a stairway. Place yourself at the head of the stairway and call the dog. They will invariably start up the stairs with their dominant paw. Also, the dominant-side paw has nails (claws) that are worn down at a faster rate than the claws on the non-dominant paw. In wolves, I've been measuring claw length with a set of very precise calipers for years on both live and dead wolves. About 76% of the time, the right side (fronts) has marginally shorter claws than the left. But, like humans, the dominant-side claws grow faster to compensate for this uneven wear and tear. However, on my two current dogs, they are both right-handed, and their right claws are marginally shorter, so I've assumed in dogs and wolves, that the uneven growth is not sufficient to maintain claw length equal to the subdominant side. If you really get into the science literature, there is even evidence that handedness in dogs has a sexual bias as well. But I'm not going into that (yet).

As trappers, how can we use this information (if you do indeed believe these data)? At a dirt-hole set, where we can highly control where the foot is placed, I believe it is very important. Not so important on a flat set, a blind set, or a pee-post set, as they are made with less precision, and we are not controlling the situation to the same degree as at a dirt/snow hole set. In watching wild wolves on remote video cameras, I've been able to watch them a few times getting caught at dirtholes. I place the trap about 2 inches off-center to the left in front of the hole. It appears to me that the final "committed" step by a wolf is on their sub-dominant side, thus giving them the use of their dominant front paw to dig at the hole. At a dirt-hole set, I catch 90+% of wolves by their left front foot. Is it because I offset to the left? I think that, yes, partially. Any time that I can increase my chances of a wolf catch, even by a tiny percentage, I'm going to take that advantage. I have absolutely no doubt that this does indeed increase my catch rate, and I will continue to use it until I learn otherwise. Too, I assume that this thought process works for coyotes as well as wolves, although I don't have the precise data on coyotes that I've gathered on wolves.

Jack



So Jack...............let's add some conjecture & complexity.

If we accept "handedness" in canines, and if we accept that canines align themselves with the earth's magnetic field when urinating and hunting, do you think that canine populations in the southern hemisphere will show the same or opposite behaviors relative to northern hemisphere critters ??


Mean As Nails
Re: Are Canines Left Footed? [Re: yukonal] #6660500
11/08/19 01:46 PM
11/08/19 01:46 PM
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Posts: 307
Wyoming
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thedude055 Offline
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Wyoming
There are certain things in the animal kingdom that just don't make sense to me. I was watching a video on Yellowstone i believe and it was talking of foxes jumping nad diving for mice in the snow. It stated without explanation other than factual research that when the fox jumped North (either from or to i cant remember) their success rate was near 100%. Far greater than the success rate of any other direction for this type of hunting on their part. I remember thinking wait what??? How in the world does it matter what direction the fox is jumping? I still don't understand it but it is intriguing to say the least.

The thought processes some of you all are putting into your trapping and or work is pretty impressive. As a natural coon trapper quantity wins over quality in my head sometimes and i have to fight that thought. Someitmes one great perfect located set is better than blanketing a whole area with traps. I still miss on that point and my catch record for the year shows i learn less from myself than i should.


2019 to date 12 Coon (2 released), 1 Muskrat, 2 cottontails, 1 Beaver, 3 Skunk, 1 Mink
Re: Are Canines Left Footed? [Re: yukonal] #6660509
11/08/19 01:59 PM
11/08/19 01:59 PM
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 27,889
McGrath, AK
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white17 Offline

"General (Mr.Sunshine) Washington"
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McGrath, AK
Dude: Yes there is some indication ( I hesitate to use the word EVIDENCE) that canines that align their bodies with the earth's magnetic filed are more successful at mousing than when they do not. If I remember correctly, that means they align NE/SW when they can.

Perhaps that is similar to what you were watching on Yellowstone


Mean As Nails
Re: Are Canines Left Footed? [Re: yukonal] #6660516
11/08/19 02:16 PM
11/08/19 02:16 PM
Joined: Jan 2009
Posts: 874
Idaho, Lemhi County
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Gulo Offline
"On The Other Hand"
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white17 -

Interesting that you would ask, Ken. Have we not discussed this previously over a campfire somewhere? Handedness, or bilateral dominance, is intriguing. I'm going to use caribou as an example. In the northern hemisphere (where caribou are naturally found), dominance of one side over the other can be seen even in antlers. Statistically, the right antler is marginally larger than the left (or the other way around, I can't remember). I noticed this many years ago. Often an adult bull caribou will have asymmetrical antler growth, easiest to see in the development of the brow tine. Even in double-shovels, one side is usually significantly larger than the other. Going through the B&C record book, you can see this yourself if you spend the time to analyze all the data.

Caribou (or reindeer?) were imported into New Zealand. In a scant two generations, the shift occurred, and (again statistically significant) left-antlered caribou became the norm. Does it have something to do with prevailing winds, weird gravity, handedness, or even the Coriolis effect? My bet is coriolis. Further, does coriolis effect have anything to do with handedness?

On the other hand (the left one), it may all be bogus, and we're perhaps just a bit too dense to appreciate what is really going on.

Jack

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