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Wild foods growing on the homestead #6942697
07/25/20 06:53 PM
07/25/20 06:53 PM
Joined: May 2013
Posts: 4,427
Northern Michigan
J
J.Morse Offline OP
trapper
J.Morse  Offline OP
trapper
J

Joined: May 2013
Posts: 4,427
Northern Michigan
Jurassic Park's thread reminded me how decent my spread is for wild food foraging. Below is a quick list of the various non-animal edibles we have to glean.
We have the usual blueberries I just spoke of on JP's thread, as well as, most years, a very few wild strawberries, wild cherries (pin and choke), serviceberries/saskatoons, wild raisins, wintergreen, blackberries (gobs), wild cranberries in our marshy ground, beaked hazelnuts, wild grapes, cattails for various edible parts, acorns galore, numerous wild greens like lamb's quarters & common milkweed (my two favorite wild greens), and autumn olive. We also have semi-wild asparagus, plums of two types, and apple trees, one of which is an ancient northern spy that has wonderful apples that usually keep very well through the winter and beyond. Some of these items are very dependable, and others are spotty and go years between good crops. I won't even list the various mushrooms I gather. I've been eyeing my Brides hosta plants lately too! Some of these things we seldom even bother with because they are a pile of work (hazelnuts for instance).

How are some of you folks's land for gathering plant-based edibles?


Re: Wild foods growing on the homestead [Re: J.Morse] #6942709
07/25/20 06:59 PM
07/25/20 06:59 PM
Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 1,846
SE WI
DuxDawg Offline
trapper
DuxDawg  Offline
trapper

Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 1,846
SE WI
Very nice!


"All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
-Edmund Burke
"We are fast approaching... rule by brute force."
-Ayn Rand
Re: Wild foods growing on the homestead [Re: J.Morse] #6942743
07/25/20 07:33 PM
07/25/20 07:33 PM
Joined: May 2013
Posts: 4,427
Northern Michigan
J
J.Morse Offline OP
trapper
J.Morse  Offline OP
trapper
J

Joined: May 2013
Posts: 4,427
Northern Michigan
Thanks Dux! Some of you other folks must have stuff worth mentioning......


Re: Wild foods growing on the homestead [Re: J.Morse] #6942763
07/25/20 07:49 PM
07/25/20 07:49 PM
Joined: May 2011
Posts: 3,916
Pa
A
Art S Offline
trapper
Art S  Offline
trapper
A

Joined: May 2011
Posts: 3,916
Pa
Got about a half acre of garlic that went feral years ago ,
we cut the scapes and started planting them in the garden ,
got a bushel and a half this year .
Not sure what kind , but it was free . smile

Re: Wild foods growing on the homestead [Re: J.Morse] #6942817
07/25/20 08:54 PM
07/25/20 08:54 PM
Joined: Dec 2019
Posts: 527
WISCONSIN
W
Wild_WI Offline
trapper
Wild_WI  Offline
trapper
W

Joined: Dec 2019
Posts: 527
WISCONSIN
Rubarb, dandelions, honey suckles, black caps, morel mushrooms all kinds of tasty stuff

Re: Wild foods growing on the homestead [Re: J.Morse] #6943017
07/25/20 11:37 PM
07/25/20 11:37 PM
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,283
SE Iowa USA
A
AKAjust Offline
trapper
AKAjust  Offline
trapper
A

Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,283
SE Iowa USA
WOW
LOL What do you do with a bushel and a half of garlic?
Won't be any vampires around your place. lol
just

Re: Wild foods growing on the homestead [Re: J.Morse] #6943021
07/25/20 11:41 PM
07/25/20 11:41 PM
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,283
SE Iowa USA
A
AKAjust Offline
trapper
AKAjust  Offline
trapper
A

Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,283
SE Iowa USA
I'd like to see a thread on wild edible plants around the yard
Dandelions Plantain etc
just.

Re: Wild foods growing on the homestead [Re: J.Morse] #6943025
07/25/20 11:42 PM
07/25/20 11:42 PM
Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 776
MN, USA
star flakes Offline
trapper
star flakes  Offline
trapper

Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 776
MN, USA
Pigweed or Amaranth for greens. Early season horse nettle is a good boiled green. Eat piles of lambsquarter in it is better than spinach.

Best fun hunting is wild asparagus galore. Mark the new patches now and pick them next year.

For wine, it is dandelion flowers. Chokecherries are coming back in the drought and they make the best jelly.

Re: Wild foods growing on the homestead [Re: J.Morse] #6943028
07/25/20 11:43 PM
07/25/20 11:43 PM
Joined: May 2013
Posts: 2,814
Green Bay, Wisconsin
tlguy Offline
trapper
tlguy  Offline
trapper

Joined: May 2013
Posts: 2,814
Green Bay, Wisconsin
Got a great patch of ramps I found this spring on our hunting land. No homestead here, but got more than enough dandelions early in the year!

Re: Wild foods growing on the homestead [Re: J.Morse] #6943330
07/26/20 11:34 AM
07/26/20 11:34 AM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 1,389
Kanabec Cty, MN
D
Drakej Offline
trapper
Drakej  Offline
trapper
D

Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 1,389
Kanabec Cty, MN
We have just about every thing that is in most edible books for our area. But their is a very big subjective difference between edible and palatable for most. Also time needed to harvest and process is a consideration. We do maple syrup, ramps, fiddleheads, wild asparagus, most wild berries(when their is a harvestable crop), minimal honey, assorted mushrooms(which we are cautiously learning to ID) and crab apples from a couple of feral homestead trees(50+ yrs old). The only value nut we have is hazel and the local bear eats them all just as they ripen every year. Our wild fruit/berry crops have become VERY sporadic lately I think for declining pollinators or pollinating weather(springs are colder/wetter). We are trying to keep a couple of honeybee hives and boost native pollinator habitat which seems to be helping. Our average is all recreational and mostly chemical free(we use limitedherbicides/insecticides in working to restore prairie habitat and a few hobby orchard trees. Most of our wild plant foraging is hobby, going out and seeing what we can gather to supplement a self harvested fish,venison or small game main dish. I personally am very glad we have grocery stores and farmers markets and not have to be a complete hunter/gatherer everyday, lol.


I've learned enough thru the years to now know that I don't know enough. KNOWLEDGE IS FREEDOM.
Re: Wild foods growing on the homestead [Re: J.Morse] #6943337
07/26/20 11:39 AM
07/26/20 11:39 AM
Joined: Dec 2019
Posts: 527
WISCONSIN
W
Wild_WI Offline
trapper
Wild_WI  Offline
trapper
W

Joined: Dec 2019
Posts: 527
WISCONSIN
Anybody in wisconsin know of a wild edibles class id like to learn more about it

Last edited by Wild_WI; 07/26/20 11:39 AM.
Re: Wild foods growing on the homestead [Re: J.Morse] #6943341
07/26/20 11:42 AM
07/26/20 11:42 AM
Joined: Mar 2020
Posts: 2,519
W NY
Turtledale Offline
trapper
Turtledale  Offline
trapper

Joined: Mar 2020
Posts: 2,519
W NY
My favorite that grows on my land is horseradish. Dig up any month with an "R"


NYSTA, NTA, FTA, life member Catt.county trappers
Re: Wild foods growing on the homestead [Re: J.Morse] #6943374
07/26/20 12:14 PM
07/26/20 12:14 PM
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 12,976
The Hill Country of Texas
Leftlane Offline
"HOSS"
Leftlane  Offline
"HOSS"

Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 12,976
The Hill Country of Texas
I have a few raspberries and as many wild onions as I can use. Thankfully they go with everything


“What’s good for me may not be good for the weak minded.”
Captain Gus McCrae- Texas Rangers


Re: Wild foods growing on the homestead [Re: J.Morse] #6943394
07/26/20 12:30 PM
07/26/20 12:30 PM
Joined: May 2013
Posts: 4,427
Northern Michigan
J
J.Morse Offline OP
trapper
J.Morse  Offline OP
trapper
J

Joined: May 2013
Posts: 4,427
Northern Michigan
I have to agree with Drakej. Some of the stuff we have growing isn't worth the effort......hazelnuts being the one that comes quickly to mind. These tiny little nuts are barely big enough to bother with. I no longer do. I would MUCH rather wait til the big nut filled pallet boxes show up in the grocery store during the holiday season....and just make a big ole scoop with the scooper!

I forgot about maple syrup! We used to make it about every spring, but haven't the last few. Our serviceberry crop is erratic as heck. Some years hardly a single berry to be found, another year they are so thick I use tarps under the trees(bushes) to gather them.
Cranberries can be fairly abundant most years, but I'm the only one in the house that will eat them, so I don't pick many any more. I made dehydrated "craisins" a time or three, and they were delicious once, and so-so the other times.
Horseradish is here, but it won't spread....one anemic plant for years. Other folks talk of it taking over their whole property. I'm jinxed with it I guess. Same with rhubarb. I am the only person in the history of the world that killed off a big ole patch of it by accident! My efforts to transplant more have failed.


Re: Wild foods growing on the homestead [Re: J.Morse] #6943406
07/26/20 12:45 PM
07/26/20 12:45 PM
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 7,743
Asheville, NC
C
charles Offline
trapper
charles  Offline
trapper
C

Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 7,743
Asheville, NC
Where I have my garden, wild tomato plants come up every year along a fence line. They produce cherry tomato in abundance up until frost. The tomato are delicious right off the vine but they do not keep the same flavor in storage We enjoy them. The vines are very small.

Re: Wild foods growing on the homestead [Re: J.Morse] #6943418
07/26/20 12:58 PM
07/26/20 12:58 PM
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 140
wisconsin
C
can45 Offline
trapper
can45  Offline
trapper
C

Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 140
wisconsin
If you want to grow more horseradish cut up the root into pieces and plant them, that's how it spreads.

Re: Wild foods growing on the homestead [Re: J.Morse] #6944565
07/27/20 04:54 PM
07/27/20 04:54 PM
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,283
SE Iowa USA
A
AKAjust Offline
trapper
AKAjust  Offline
trapper
A

Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,283
SE Iowa USA
Originally Posted by J.Morse
I have to agree with Drakej. Some of the stuff we have growing isn't worth the effort......hazelnuts being the one that comes quickly to mind. These tiny little nuts are barely big enough to bother with. I no longer do. I would MUCH rather wait til the big nut filled pallet boxes show up in the grocery store during the holiday season....and just make a big ole scoop with the scooper!

I forgot about maple syrup! We used to make it about every spring, but haven't the last few. Our serviceberry crop is erratic as heck. Some years hardly a single berry to be found, another year they are so thick I use tarps under the trees(bushes) to gather them.
Cranberries can be fairly abundant most years, but I'm the only one in the house that will eat them, so I don't pick many any more. I made dehydrated "craisins" a time or three, and they were delicious once, and so-so the other times.
Horseradish is here, but it won't spread....one anemic plant for years. Other folks talk of it taking over their whole property. I'm jinxed with it I guess. Same with rhubarb. I am the only person in the history of the world that killed off a big ole patch of it by accident! My efforts to transplant more have failed.




Grandma's rhubarb was right next to the out house. lol
Had a good patch every year.
lol
,
just

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