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Re: Grayling [Re: yukonjeff] #7022217
10/20/20 12:44 PM
10/20/20 12:44 PM
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 10,329
ny
U
upstateNY Offline
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upstateNY  Offline
trapper
U

Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 10,329
ny
Originally Posted by yukonjeff
Not as good as fresh for sure. The trick is to get them from the water to the freezer fast and do it on a cool day. You can see their colors fade fast too.

Fun to play with them on a fly rod. I did it a few times. Can catch way more than with spinners, but both are fun.

Forgot I did a video about 5 years ago. Must of posted it before.



That looks like a lot of fun.Do you scale them,,or eat the skin and all like on a brook trout?


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Re: Grayling [Re: upstateNY] #7022228
10/20/20 12:55 PM
10/20/20 12:55 PM
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 9,319
MN, Land of 10,000 Lakes
T
Trapper7 Offline
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Trapper7  Offline
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Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 9,319
MN, Land of 10,000 Lakes
Originally Posted by upstateNY
Originally Posted by yukonjeff
Not as good as fresh for sure. The trick is to get them from the water to the freezer fast and do it on a cool day. You can see their colors fade fast too.

Fun to play with them on a fly rod. I did it a few times. Can catch way more than with spinners, but both are fun.

Forgot I did a video about 5 years ago. Must of posted it before.



That looks like a lot of fun.Do you scale them,,or eat the skin and all like on a brook trout?

Interesting video. Looks like you're using a small spinner of some sort. They're pretty scrappy; like a trout.


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Re: Grayling [Re: yukonjeff] #7022236
10/20/20 01:10 PM
10/20/20 01:10 PM
Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 2,597
M.T.V. Alaska
Y
yukonjeff Offline OP
trapper
yukonjeff  Offline OP
trapper
Y

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 2,597
M.T.V. Alaska
Upstate NY They do have scales bigger than a trout. I don't scale any fish anymore. It makes the meat mushy . I fry them with the scales, and the skin, and scales are crunchy goodness when done.

Trapper 7 I was using a Panther Marten that day but they bite about any small Mepps. They like the squirrel tail ones. They think they are mice. I have caught them with belly loads of Voles before.

Re: Grayling [Re: Trapper7] #7022256
10/20/20 01:34 PM
10/20/20 01:34 PM
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 30,550
McGrath, AK
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white17 Offline

"General (Mr.Sunshine) Washington"
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Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 30,550
McGrath, AK
Originally Posted by Trapper7
Originally Posted by white17
Fun to catch but I don't like eating them. I would much rather catch and eat a Dolly.

Used to catch them for dog food this time of year. There would be hundreds swarming around the set net eating the eggs squirting out of silver salmon in the net

That was my question: How are they for eating? I can't go by you because once I recall you saying you don't like salmon and that's my favorite fish to eat. grin I regularly buy Alaskan Caught Sockeye at Sam's Club.


To me, grayling are soft, mushy fish with billions of bones the size of human hairs. You expend more energy eating them than you gain.

The only way I will eat salmon now is if it is dried in cold smoke.

If you like fish, try some black cod. You'll never eat that Sam's Club dog food again.


Mean As Nails
Re: Grayling [Re: Trapper7] #7022301
10/20/20 02:40 PM
10/20/20 02:40 PM
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 441
Canada
O
Ouananiche Offline
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Ouananiche  Offline
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Joined: May 2016
Posts: 441
Canada
Originally Posted by Trapper7
Originally Posted by white17
Fun to catch but I don't like eating them. I would much rather catch and eat a Dolly.

Used to catch them for dog food this time of year. There would be hundreds swarming around the set net eating the eggs squirting out of silver salmon in the net

That was my question: How are they for eating? I can't go by you because once I recall you saying you don't like salmon and that's my favorite fish to eat. grin I regularly buy Alaskan Caught Sockeye at Sam's Club.



Grayling ARE salmon.

If you like one, you are likely to enjoy the other.

As with Lake Trout actually.... But they are more environment dependent.

Re: Grayling [Re: yukonjeff] #7022329
10/20/20 03:04 PM
10/20/20 03:04 PM
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 664
AK
bfisch Offline
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bfisch  Offline
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Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 664
AK
Ice has been flowing on the river here for almost a week. How long ago did you take the video? I am lucky to catch one ice fishing each year otherwise they are way, way up river other times of the year.

Re: Grayling [Re: yukonjeff] #7022574
10/20/20 07:38 PM
10/20/20 07:38 PM
Joined: May 2013
Posts: 4,030
Northern Michigan
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J.Morse Offline
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J.Morse  Offline
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Posts: 4,030
Northern Michigan
Totally cool fish Jeff, thanks for sharing them with us. The Grayling disappeared from my area before I was born, having died out around the turn of the 20th century in the Lower Peninsula. They lasted in the Otter River of the U.P. until around 1932. When my Great Grandfather was born Grayling were wildly abundant in our local rivers. People didn't take long to totally rid our area of them. I grew up with the idea that Grayling were the Holy Grail of fish. I wanted to experience the thrill of fishing for them that was available to my family before I was born, but it was decades before I was able to fish for them. A road trip up the Alcan in 1981 was when I caught my first ones. There is a project in the works that may return a self-sustaining population to Michigan within the next 4-5 years, but I won't hold my breath. The state has tried several times to bring them back. This time I hope it works, I'd love for my grandsons to be able to fish for them near home like their Great Great Great Grandad could.


Re: Grayling [Re: J.Morse] #7022810
10/20/20 11:40 PM
10/20/20 11:40 PM
Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 2,597
M.T.V. Alaska
Y
yukonjeff Offline OP
trapper
yukonjeff  Offline OP
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Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 2,597
M.T.V. Alaska
Originally Posted by bfisch
Ice has been flowing on the river here for almost a week. How long ago did you take the video? I am lucky to catch one ice fishing each year otherwise they are way, way up river other times of the year.


That was 5 years ago today. Looks the same today. No ice here yet. I still have the net set in front of the house.

[Linked Image]

Originally Posted by J.Morse
Totally cool fish Jeff, thanks for sharing them with us. The Grayling disappeared from my area before I was born, having died out around the turn of the 20th century in the Lower Peninsula. They lasted in the Otter River of the U.P. until around 1932. When my Great Grandfather was born Grayling were wildly abundant in our local rivers. People didn't take long to totally rid our area of them. I grew up with the idea that Grayling were the Holy Grail of fish. I wanted to experience the thrill of fishing for them that was available to my family before I was born, but it was decades before I was able to fish for them. A road trip up the Alcan in 1981 was when I caught my first ones. There is a project in the works that may return a self-sustaining population to Michigan within the next 4-5 years, but I won't hold my breath. The state has tried several times to bring them back. This time I hope it works, I'd love for my grandsons to be able to fish for them near home like their Great Great Great Grandad could.


I hope you can reestablish them. They live in the headwaters of spring fed streams most of the summer, so I think they are susceptible to warm waters, and yes easily overfished. We dont have limits here but they only bite well in early spring and late fall.

Some will catch 20-30 about now when they are biting, but not alot of people here and not much fishing pressure yet. They do eat salmon eggs so as a commercial fisherman its a love hate relationship, but I am always happy to share with nature, and would hate to see their demise.

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