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Re: What It Was Like Being A Mountain Man In 1800's [Re: K9Wolfer] #7110475
12/29/20 10:02 AM
12/29/20 10:02 AM
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Posts: 41,053
Minnesota
330-Trapper Online content
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Green River Rendezvous was an annual event in the 1830s. Mountain Men, Trappers, Travelers and Indians all gathered in a valley "below the Green" river and bartered, traded, sold, and swapped various items such as skins, pelts, guns, jewelry and whatever else they needed. All knew the place where Horse Creek flowed into the Green in the Upper Green River Valley, the site of six Rendezvous. The Rendezvous lasted anywhere from a few days to several months and was a time for getting new supplies, renewing acquaintenances with old friends, story swapping, drinking and general rowdiness.

Contact Main Street Pinedale for information about the parade and vendor booths: 307-231-0302, www.greenriverrendezvous.com.

Join us in July for the Green River Rendezvous


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www.BackroadsRevised@etsy.com




Re: What It Was Like Being A Mountain Man In 1800's [Re: K9Wolfer] #7110488
12/29/20 10:09 AM
12/29/20 10:09 AM
Joined: Jan 2015
Posts: 127
Metropolis Il.
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story Offline
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story  Offline
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Metropolis Il.
Good morning trappermen. Its been several years ago and my memory isn't what it used to be but I think we went to a trapping museum in northwestern part of Nebraska. Anyone been to it or did I just dream about it.

Re: What It Was Like Being A Mountain Man In 1800's [Re: K9Wolfer] #7110489
12/29/20 10:10 AM
12/29/20 10:10 AM
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 36,920
Northern Maine
Bruce T Offline
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Bruce T  Offline
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Northern Maine
Thanks 330 trapper.I also just found this as well
about 1835, ministers also became a regular feature at the Rendezvous. Over the years, a few of these included the Reverend Samuel Parker, Father De Smet, and Dr. Marcus Whitman.

The annual rendezvous, referred to as the Rocky Mountain Rendezvous, was often held at Horse Creek on the Green River, now called the Upper Green River Rendezvous Site, near present-day Pinedale, Wyoming. Subsequently, the annual event was also called the Green River Rendezvous.

Hudson Bay Company traders by Henry Alexander Ogden.
Hudson Bay Company traders by Henry Alexander Ogden.

By the mid-1830s, the annual event would attract up to 500 men, essentially all the American trappers and traders working in the Rockies, as well as numerous Native Americans. However, this, like so many other endeavors of the Wild West, was soon to change, when the Canadian-based Hudsonís Bay Company determined to destroy the American fur trade. Beginning in 1834, the Hudsonís Bay Company visited the Rocky Mountain Rendezvous to buy and trade for furs. The Canadian company was able to offer manufactured trade goods at prices far below that with which American fur companies could compete. This competition combined with a decline in demand for beaver pelts effectively destroyed the American fur trade system. The last rendezvous was held in 1840.


Of the 15 annual meetings held, eight of the Rendezvous took place at a Green River site and five convened near the junction of Horse Creek and the Green River.

Today, the main Rendezvous site, located near Pinedale, Wyoming is a National Historic Landmark. Each year, a reenactment of the Rendezvous is held on the second Sunday in July each year at the Museum of The Mountain Man in Pinedale. The celebration is part re-enactment and part living history.

The actual Green River Rendezvous site is located four miles west of Pinedale on U.S. Highway 187.


More Information:

Museum of the Mountain Man
Sublette County Historical Society Inc
PO Box 909
700 E Hennick
Pinedale, Wyoming 82941
1-877-686-6266

You may also be interested in the Rocky Mountain National Rendezvous re-enactment website.

© Kathy Weiser/Legends of America, updated February 2020.

Trapper's Last Shot by T.D. Booth
Trapperís Last Shot by T.D. Booth

Also See:

Explorers, Trappers, & Traders

Frontier Types

The Great Fur Trade Companies

In a Trapperís Bivouac

Incidents of the Fur Trade

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My President is still President Trump
Re: What It Was Like Being A Mountain Man In 1800's [Re: K9Wolfer] #7110490
12/29/20 10:10 AM
12/29/20 10:10 AM
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 41,053
Minnesota
330-Trapper Online content
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Minnesota
Sure Bruce


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Re: What It Was Like Being A Mountain Man In 1800's [Re: story] #7110518
12/29/20 10:31 AM
12/29/20 10:31 AM
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,652
east central WI
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k snow Offline
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east central WI
Originally Posted by story
Good morning trappermen. Its been several years ago and my memory isn't what it used to be but I think we went to a trapping museum in northwestern part of Nebraska. Anyone been to it or did I just dream about it.


Museum of the Fur Trade, Chadron, Nebraska.

Re: What It Was Like Being A Mountain Man In 1800's [Re: K9Wolfer] #7110520
12/29/20 10:32 AM
12/29/20 10:32 AM
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 1,991
Southern Illinois
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Southern Illinois

Last edited by Foxpaw; 12/29/20 10:33 AM.
Re: What It Was Like Being A Mountain Man In 1800's [Re: K9Wolfer] #7110532
12/29/20 10:41 AM
12/29/20 10:41 AM
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 36,920
Northern Maine
Bruce T Offline
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Awesome Foxpaw thanks for posting.


My President is still President Trump
Re: What It Was Like Being A Mountain Man In 1800's [Re: Law Dog] #7110554
12/29/20 11:04 AM
12/29/20 11:04 AM
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 10,098
MN, Land of 10,000 Lakes
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Trapper7 Offline
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MN, Land of 10,000 Lakes
Originally Posted by Law Dog
Short life span.

For sure. Simple things that are so treatable and fixable now, would mean a death sentence back then.


Dear Algebra, Please stop asking us to find your X. She's never coming back and don't ask Y.
Re: What It Was Like Being A Mountain Man In 1800's [Re: k snow] #7110569
12/29/20 11:17 AM
12/29/20 11:17 AM
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Dunbar, Wisconsin
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Dunbar, Wisconsin
Originally Posted by k snow
Originally Posted by Pike River



Do you have any info about Rendevous in the Great Lakes area and/or Portage?


The fur trade looked a lot different in the Great Lakes. Goods left Montreal in canoes in the spring to resupply forts and posts. Natives, for the most part, brought their skins to the posts or forts to trade. In the later years, some euro traders would travel to native areas to trade direct. The skins were then canoes back to Montreal. A few euros, less hivernants, would spend the winter with native families. Quite often, the traders would marry into native families for trading ties. Euros did very little fur gathering, unlike the rocky Mountain trade. Some was done, but the bulk of hides were from the natives.



When you mention euro's I'm assuming you're referring to the coureur des bois? I feel like WI has a much-underappreciated trapper history. Reading some accounts of when the US finally gained control of WI Greenbay was made up of almost entirely of natives, metis and french. Also when reading the accounts of Kinzie and his experience along the Fox/Wisconsin route.

Re: What It Was Like Being A Mountain Man In 1800's [Re: K9Wolfer] #7110575
12/29/20 11:23 AM
12/29/20 11:23 AM
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 5,353
Oregon
beaverpeeler Offline
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Oregon
I was wondering if I would get called out for stating that three of the Rendevouz were held in Mexico. Couldn't get anybody to bite.

Utah was Mexican territory at the time.


"Can't we all just get along?" ---Rodney King (1991)
Re: What It Was Like Being A Mountain Man In 1800's [Re: K9Wolfer] #7110584
12/29/20 11:34 AM
12/29/20 11:34 AM
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Posts: 5,353
Oregon
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Oregon
Bruce, the Pinedale information is a little wobbly in my opinion. I am fairly well versed on the mountain man era and I never heard of the Hudson bay Company having any representation at a mountain man Rendevouz in Wyoming. I think the confusion is Wyeth, who was a New Englander with the American Fur company came overland in '34 to compete with the Rocky Mountain Fur company. He got there late if I remember right and had to take his goods elsewhere. I believe he built Fort Hall which eventually was sold to the HBC.

Also, famously, the Americans paid a lot better for beaver which lured some of HBC's free hunters on occasion to sell to the competition.


"Can't we all just get along?" ---Rodney King (1991)
Re: What It Was Like Being A Mountain Man In 1800's [Re: K9Wolfer] #7110589
12/29/20 11:40 AM
12/29/20 11:40 AM
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 30,004
james bay frontierOnt.
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james bay frontierOnt.


The fur trade looked a lot different in the Great Lakes. Goods left Montreal in canoes in the spring to resupply forts and posts. Natives, for the most part, brought their skins to the posts or forts to trade. In the later years, some euro traders would travel to native areas to trade direct. The skins were then canoes back to Montreal. A few euros, less hivernants, would spend the winter with native families. Quite often, the traders would marry into native families for trading ties. Euros did very little fur gathering, unlike the rocky Mountain trade. Some was done, but the bulk of hides were from the natives.

[/quote]

When you mention euro's I'm assuming you're referring to the coureur des bois? I feel like WI has a much-underappreciated trapper history. Reading some accounts of when the US finally gained control of WI Greenbay was made up of almost entirely of natives, metis and french. Also when reading the accounts of Kinzie and his experience along the Fox/Wisconsin route.
[/quote]


I think they mean Canadians.Canadians from Montreal were the major competition for the HBC.Canadians referred to in the Fur trade history were the Courreur de Bois and worked for many different fur companys who not only competed with the HBC but each other as well.The HBC could tell when Native groups had been trading with the Canadians because the trade goods like knives guns etc were different

Re: What It Was Like Being A Mountain Man In 1800's [Re: K9Wolfer] #7110628
12/29/20 12:04 PM
12/29/20 12:04 PM
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,652
east central WI
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k snow Offline
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K

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east central WI
By euro, I am addressing the variety of people of European descent who participated in the fur trade. It starts in the Great Lakes with the French, then the English and Scottish moved in, lastly the Americans.

The term courier du bois very specifically refers to those traders who were not licensed by the French to trade with the natives. In the time period it was a derogatory term, akin to poacher nowadays in hunting circles. Courier du bois has come to be loosely applied to any french trader travelling to native villages to trade.

Wisconsin has a very rich history prior to becoming a state. Trapping, trading and Indian wars as violent as anything out west. Lots of french and metis in the state. Public education teaches wisconsin started with logging and beer and German settlement.

Re: What It Was Like Being A Mountain Man In 1800's [Re: K9Wolfer] #7110629
12/29/20 12:05 PM
12/29/20 12:05 PM
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 41,053
Minnesota
330-Trapper Online content
trapper
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Minnesota
Oh, to go back in time For a Year


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Re: What It Was Like Being A Mountain Man In 1800's [Re: K9Wolfer] #7110642
12/29/20 12:18 PM
12/29/20 12:18 PM
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Posts: 5,353
Oregon
beaverpeeler Offline
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Oregon
Interesting side story to the first wagons to cross the rockies.

This was the Spaulding-Whitman party who were headed to the Oregon territory as missionaries. When they showed up at the Rendevouz of '36 they created quite a stir. Now the plains indians were not averse to trading some quality time with their squaws for trade goods. SO ....when they saw Narcissa with her long blond hair and blue eyes they immediately wanted to know which man she belonged to, and "How much"? The trappers were kind of caught in an awkward situation to have to explain that that kind of thing was frowned upon in white society. LOL And the indians suddenly aware of white hypocrisy.

Last edited by beaverpeeler; 12/29/20 12:20 PM.

"Can't we all just get along?" ---Rodney King (1991)
Re: What It Was Like Being A Mountain Man In 1800's [Re: K9Wolfer] #7110710
12/29/20 01:13 PM
12/29/20 01:13 PM
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 1,991
Southern Illinois
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Foxpaw Offline
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Southern Illinois
Beaverpeelers remark about the whites not selling women prompted me to ask this>

Who was the first woman to ever vote?

Which leaves the question who was the first black man to vote?

They occurred at the same time.

Last edited by Foxpaw; 12/29/20 01:15 PM.
Re: What It Was Like Being A Mountain Man In 1800's [Re: K9Wolfer] #7110762
12/29/20 01:45 PM
12/29/20 01:45 PM
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Posts: 2,567
meadowview, Virginia
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meadowview, Virginia
Quote
The big mountain man get together every year happened in Pinedale Wyoming. All the mountain men gathered there every year.


What I am reading is that of the 15 rendezvous held in a 16 year period (1825-1840), 6 were at the Green River/Horse Creek site near Pinedale. That's more than any 2 other sites combined, certainly making it the most significant site.

Good map of the sites here: [img]http://thefurtrapper.com/home/rendezvous-sites/[/img]

Re: What It Was Like Being A Mountain Man In 1800's [Re: K9Wolfer] #7110788
12/29/20 02:06 PM
12/29/20 02:06 PM
Joined: Dec 2006
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S.W.Oregon
newhouse114 Offline
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And beaver were $3/ lb. Not much has changed!


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Re: What It Was Like Being A Mountain Man In 1800's [Re: K9Wolfer] #7110792
12/29/20 02:10 PM
12/29/20 02:10 PM
Joined: May 2013
Posts: 4,166
Northern Michigan
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J.Morse Offline
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Northern Michigan
Beaverpeeler, I "got it"!

Foxpaw.....Sacagawea/York

Who was America's first millionaire?.........hint, he had headquarters on Mackinaw Island for a time. At least a "warehouse" of sorts.


Re: What It Was Like Being A Mountain Man In 1800's [Re: J.Morse] #7110805
12/29/20 02:27 PM
12/29/20 02:27 PM
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 1,991
Southern Illinois
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Foxpaw Offline
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Southern Illinois
Originally Posted by J.Morse
Beaverpeeler, I "got it"!

Foxpaw.....Sacagawea/York

Who was America's first millionaire?.........hint, he had headquarters on Mackinaw Island for a time. At least a "warehouse" of sorts.



Yep thats right, now if I could only pronounce that girls name and it be right. AS for millionaire maybe Astor for first in America and Dousman in Wisconsin, both fur related I think.

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