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Re: Old Ski-Doo sleds revived by Russian company [Re: broncoformudv] #7195073
02/24/21 10:26 PM
02/24/21 10:26 PM
Joined: Oct 2011
Posts: 608
Idaho
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bearcat2 Offline
trapper
bearcat2  Offline
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Joined: Oct 2011
Posts: 608
Idaho
Yes your English is good (better than mine and it's the only language I speak wink ) and that picture of the sled you pull behind the snowmachine looks like a lot of the ones people (houndmen and trappers) use around here, except they are usually metal and synthetic. I used to run a sled with skis but switched to an Otter sled, but a)we don't have the extreme cold that you guys do and b)I added UHMW 'outrigger' skis on the outer edges to give it a wider footprint so have never had a problem when bouncing it off trees and gates. . . well other than pulling the hitch off one time when I caught the sled on a rootwad at speed.

Re: Old Ski-Doo sleds revived by Russian company [Re: broncoformudv] #7195117
02/24/21 11:19 PM
02/24/21 11:19 PM
Joined: Feb 2011
Posts: 549
Interior Alaska
3
30/06 Offline
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30/06  Offline
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Joined: Feb 2011
Posts: 549
Interior Alaska
Tatiana, what occupies the top of your local food chain? Wolves, Brown Bears, perhaps Sib. Tigers? Do you travel back country armed like most do here in Alaska?

Re: Old Ski-Doo sleds revived by Russian company [Re: broncoformudv] #7195280
02/25/21 07:45 AM
02/25/21 07:45 AM
Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 338
Labrador, Canada
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crosspatch Offline
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crosspatch  Offline
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Posts: 338
Labrador, Canada
Interesting, and once again quite detailed, write up on beaver. The easy places to trap prime under ice otter will follow the spread of beaver dams. Thanks again for another interesting read.

Re: Old Ski-Doo sleds revived by Russian company [Re: 30/06] #7195495
02/25/21 11:49 AM
02/25/21 11:49 AM
Joined: Nov 2017
Posts: 18
Siberia
T
Tatiana Offline
trapper
Tatiana  Offline
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Joined: Nov 2017
Posts: 18
Siberia
Originally Posted by 30/06
Tatiana, what occupies the top of your local food chain? Wolves, Brown Bears, perhaps Sib. Tigers? Do you travel back country armed like most do here in Alaska?

Brown bears. They're not as aggressive as some bears in East Siberia, but not all of them are timid, especially in remote areas with little hunting pressure. I'm personally not very fond of bears after a couple of scary encounters. There are too few bear hunters nowadays compared to the Soviet and early post-Soviet times partly because of severed trade channels and decreased demand for paws and bile to China, and partly because everyone just wants big ungulates.This leads to tragedies every now and then. Generally, men here carry guns when in the forest, women - not so often (owning and carrying guns, especially rifles, is a major headache in Russia, and losing a gun is a nightmare). I don't have a gun and usually just carry a can of bear spray and/or a flare when I go on long walks around the village for mushrooms, berries and fishing, and just try to avoid places where chances of meeting a bear are especially high (such as wildlife trails in narrow places between water bodies). My husband generally carries an Izh-27 shotgun around, less often a rifle.

Still, the best protection against bears is a good laika dog - they can stop and/or chase away a bear (most bears prefer to flee). Laikas have strong intrinsic hate towards bears, even laikas who are generally mild-tempered and kind towards other animals. Just to illustrate, this fall our gentle, goofy dog attacked, bit and chased away a medium-sized bear that was feeding on a cranberry patch further up the trail.


Last edited by Tatiana; 02/25/21 12:54 PM.
Re: Old Ski-Doo sleds revived by Russian company [Re: broncoformudv] #7195543
02/25/21 12:44 PM
02/25/21 12:44 PM
Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 338
Labrador, Canada
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crosspatch Offline
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crosspatch  Offline
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Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 338
Labrador, Canada
Wow hope u don't get in trouble for posting the rant. Be careful.

Re: Old Ski-Doo sleds revived by Russian company [Re: crosspatch] #7195560
02/25/21 12:53 PM
02/25/21 12:53 PM
Joined: Nov 2017
Posts: 18
Siberia
T
Tatiana Offline
trapper
Tatiana  Offline
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Joined: Nov 2017
Posts: 18
Siberia
Originally Posted by crosspatch
Wow hope u don't get in trouble for posting the rant. Be careful.

Yes, I should probably edit it out. It's a very painful issue here, especially combined with some long-lasting human rights issues (a friend of mine is an advocate of Siberian peoples' rights and a few years ago, when she was going to speak about these problems in the UN HQ, a customs officer simply snipped a few pages out of her passport with scissors and they fined her for damaging govermnent property instead of letting her out of the country). But I've read the rules - no politics!

Re: Old Ski-Doo sleds revived by Russian company [Re: broncoformudv] #7195601
02/25/21 01:31 PM
02/25/21 01:31 PM
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 31,987
McGrath, AK
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white17 Offline

"General (Mr.Sunshine) Washington"
white17  Offline

"General (Mr.Sunshine) Washington"
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Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 31,987
McGrath, AK
The no politics rule here just applies to arguments and name calling concerning domestic politics.

Please feel free to discuss the conditions you must put up with in describing your life and how it impacts your everyday activities. Whatever you are comfortable posting. You won't be violating any rules here. We greatly appreciate your contributions !


Mean As Nails
Re: Old Ski-Doo sleds revived by Russian company [Re: broncoformudv] #7195912
02/25/21 07:04 PM
02/25/21 07:04 PM
Joined: Feb 2011
Posts: 549
Interior Alaska
3
30/06 Offline
trapper
30/06  Offline
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3

Joined: Feb 2011
Posts: 549
Interior Alaska
I agree with you Tatiana, that a good dog is the best bear protection. Personally, I almost always bring my 77 caliber, I mean pound, German Shepherd, along. She's thus far untested against a live bear, but skillfully engages moose and runs them off until I call her back. Before that I had a 90 caliber German Shepherd who skillfully handled bears, moose, and strangers. Hopefully he passed along some wisdom to the current Shepherd. Thanks again for describing your outdoor world.

Re: Old Ski-Doo sleds revived by Russian company [Re: broncoformudv] #7196002
02/25/21 08:21 PM
02/25/21 08:21 PM
Joined: Oct 2011
Posts: 608
Idaho
B
bearcat2 Offline
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Posts: 608
Idaho
Do your remaining bear hunters use dogs to hunt them? I seem to recall reading that they used Liakas in eastern europe and Russia to hunt bears much like they do hounds here.

Re: Old Ski-Doo sleds revived by Russian company [Re: broncoformudv] #7196560
02/26/21 09:32 AM
02/26/21 09:32 AM
Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 5,119
Manitoba
N
Northof50 Offline
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Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 5,119
Manitoba
Thank you for the insights you are dealing with Tatiana.
My brother has 2 Norwegian Elk hounds and it is always an adventure when you go for a walk in the boreal forest here. The different barks tells you what is there and a sharp whistle stops the chase. Research in bear country is always a challenge especially when you are looking for ticks. They actually took a dog down to the zoo to " climatize it to bears " because they were working in the mountains on bear trails looking for ticks and some of the associated diseases. Dogs are good tick collectors as well, 4 legs is better than 2. That dog sure got excited when ever it saw my truck coming, cause another adventure was awaiting. Besides the hour of grooming at the end of the day- looking for ticks. And the next day looking for the missed ones. RIP Banner, Mr Pup.

Some of the people from Germany in the summer over here use their dogs( German wire hairs) for looking for " yellow pine mushrooms "( Suillus sibricus ) they have dog collars with trackers and the dog stops at a site they are about to come up. These are picked and air-expressed overseas for the restaurant trade daily. Pre-exposed do not have the fungus gnats laid in them yet

Last edited by Northof50; 02/27/21 09:30 AM. Reason: posiable name of mushroom
Re: Old Ski-Doo sleds revived by Russian company [Re: broncoformudv] #7196747
02/26/21 12:39 PM
02/26/21 12:39 PM
Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 6,191
Alaska and Washington State
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waggler Offline
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Alaska and Washington State
Speaking of great dogs, I got a West Siberian laika back about 1998. One of very few in north America at that time (maybe there are more now, I don't know).
What a great dog to have in the woods. Many people thought it was an Alaskan husky because of it's markings. But laikas don't have the roaming nature of huskies, huskies will take off on their own if you allow them to, whereas a laika will loupe out through the timber, return to you, then loupe out again. They are death on anything that climbs a tree, hunting by nose and sight.
My "Bo" (may he RIP) loved hunting squirrels in particular, we were not allowed to hunt marten, only trap them, but Bo didn't know that. He really loved fighting coons, and stray house cats were game as far as he was concerned.
In this picture he is eating an aplodontia that happened to wander into his yard. Whether it was squirrels or anything else, he would start by crunching the head to a pulp before swallowing it, then work his way down the body until the tail was the last thing to go down the hatch.
He's a little over-weight in this picture.
[Linked Image]


"I'm not skilled to understand"
Re: Old Ski-Doo sleds revived by Russian company [Re: 30/06] #7197669
02/27/21 02:53 AM
02/27/21 02:53 AM
Joined: Nov 2017
Posts: 18
Siberia
T
Tatiana Offline
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Tatiana  Offline
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Joined: Nov 2017
Posts: 18
Siberia
Originally Posted by 30/06
, I almost always bring my 77 caliber, I mean pound, German Shepherd, along. She's thus far untested against a live bear, but skillfully engages moose and runs them off until I call her back. Before that I had a 90 caliber German Shepherd who skillfully handled bears, moose, and strangers.

This is brilliant, I'll definitely adopt this gauging standard grin
Originally Posted by bearcat2
Do your remaining bear hunters use dogs to hunt them?

Absolutely. The new Garmin collars come in very handy. Laikas have a way of stopping bears by circling around them very rapidly. They're eerily good at it (just like border collies are good at herding) when you play with a laika and it gets into that circling mode, there is no way you can as much as touch it even if it's just a couple of feet away from you. In rural areas, people mostly test and train their laikas by taking them hunting together with more experienced dogs; in more populated areas, there are training stations with captive bears and badgers, which used to be an essential part of the Soviet hunting and cynological system, because they allowed to train and test your dogs' skills before actual "deployment", and to weed out cowardly and dumb dogs (a dog that runs to hide behind your back after harassing a bear means certain death unless you are an accurate, well-prepared and extremely lucky shooter). Nowadays these stations are being either closed or "humanized" (i.e. there are new rules banning possible contact between dogs and bears) because of animal rights activists among lawmakers, even though the harsh reality means that it will inevitably lead to more human (and canine) casualties in rural areas - bear hunting is still unavoidable because in many cases it's basically animal control (culling dangerous bears that get too close to human dwelling, rogue bears, etc...).
Killing bears in dens has been prohibited for a while, but a) game wardens are the rarest species in taiga and b) den hunting has always been a "VIP" sport, and nowadays, when power is concentrated in the hands of paramilitary and law enforcement officials, it is in high demand, albeit illegal. In these hunts, laikas are an essential safety component. They also help to discover dens in early winter.
One of the most popular bear hunting methods here involves bait stations and cable snares (again, it's not entirely legal), and unless there is access to such a station from water, a dog is necessary to warn you well ahead if there's a bear in the snare.
Laikas are also good for hunting capercaillie, becase grouse generally don't flee at the sight of a dog, and a barking dog distracts the bird from the approaching hunter. We (our family) do not hunt capercaillie anymore, even though it's legal, because they have become too few - our rivers have sandy/muddy banks without any rocks and all grouse gather on roadsides to collect gravel for their gizzards - and get shot from passing cars (no game wardens in sight, ever). There's also a really crazy local tradition to leave broken vodka bottles in forest clearings because shiny glass shards attract grouse, and you can often find polished glass fragments in their gizzards. What these people don't stop to think about is that perhaps the majority of birds who eat the shards die from crop lacerations or bleed out - unseen. It's beyond reasoning.


Re: Old Ski-Doo sleds revived by Russian company [Re: Northof50] #7197677
02/27/21 04:10 AM
02/27/21 04:10 AM
Joined: Nov 2017
Posts: 18
Siberia
T
Tatiana Offline
trapper
Tatiana  Offline
trapper
T

Joined: Nov 2017
Posts: 18
Siberia
Originally Posted by Northof50
Thank you for the insights you are dealing with Tatiana.
My brother has 2 Norwegian Elk hounds and it is always an adventure when you go for a walk in the boreal forest here. The different barks tells you what is there and a sharp whistle stops the chase. Research in bear country is always a challenge especially when you are looking for ticks. They actually took a dog down to the zoo to " climatize it to bears " because they were working in the mountains on bear trails looking for ticks and some of the associated diseases. Dogs are good tick collectors as well, 4 legs is better than 2. That dog sure got excited when ever it saw my truck coming, cause another adventure was awaiting. Besides the hour of grooming at the end of the day- looking for ticks. And the next day looking for the missed ones. RIP Banner, Mr Pup.

Yes, the different barks are amazing - with some experience, you can tell if it's grouse, squirrel, sable, or something bigger (but hearing low-pitched angry barking is very scary!). Ixodid ticks are the second most dangerous animal in the forest here for dogs because of piroplasmosis, and hands down the most dangerous animal in the forest-steppes of Southwestern Siberia - there are way fewer bears there, but there's tick-borne piroplasmosis for dogs, and viral diseases, such as tick-born encephalitis, for humans. The latter killed one of my best friends two years ago, a healthy, wonderful 33-year old guy. A tick collar spares a lot of grief (and for humans, it's diethyltoluamide sprays). As far as I know, the best animal to collect ticks for study is the hedgehog, because they collect all ticks as they go, like magnets. There's even an accepted measure of ixodid tick abundance called yezhe-chas (hedgehog-hour).

Quote
Some of the people from Germany in the summer over here use their dogs( German wire hairs) for looking for " yellow pine mushrooms "( Suillus sibricus ) they have dog collars with trackers and the dog stops at a site they are about to come up. These are picked and air-expressed overseas for the restraint trade daily. Pre-exposed do not have the fungus gnats laid in them yet


Interesting! I've heard that some people train dogs to find truffles in southwestern Russia, where there are oaks, but not here. Coincidentally, my friend here in the village did some phylogenetic work on Suillus. Among other things, she compared Suillus sibiricus from Michigan with what's often called S. americanus in older Russian checklists, a Pinus sibirica-associated species, and they turned out to be the same species, genetically. They're quite abundant here at times but few people bother to collect them, preferring king boletes or larger Suillus species (such as S. luteus).

this is what people are after here:
[Linked Image]
Suillus sibiricus from this fall
[Linked Image]

Re: Old Ski-Doo sleds revived by Russian company [Re: waggler] #7197680
02/27/21 05:01 AM
02/27/21 05:01 AM
Joined: Nov 2017
Posts: 18
Siberia
T
Tatiana Offline
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Tatiana  Offline
trapper
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Joined: Nov 2017
Posts: 18
Siberia
Originally Posted by waggler
Speaking of great dogs, I got a West Siberian laika back about 1998. One of very few in north America at that time (maybe there are more now, I don't know).
What a great dog to have in the woods. Many people thought it was an Alaskan husky because of it's markings. But laikas don't have the roaming nature of huskies, huskies will take off on their own if you allow them to, whereas a laika will loupe out through the timber, return to you, then loupe out again. They are death on anything that climbs a tree, hunting by nose and sight.
My "Bo" (may he RIP) loved hunting squirrels in particular, we were not allowed to hunt marten, only trap them, but Bo didn't know that. He really loved fighting coons, and stray house cats were game as far as he was concerned.
In this picture he is eating an aplodontia that happened to wander into his yard. Whether it was squirrels or anything else, he would start by crunching the head to a pulp before swallowing it, then work his way down the body until the tail was the last thing to go down the hatch.

Such a spot on portrait of the breed! "Bo" is sweet! He looks a lot like our old dog "Bosyi" (RIP).

Laikas do indeed tend to go about in loops. At one moment, the dog is walking along with you, and then just disappears for a while. Generally, more experienced dogs make bigger loops, and some over-enthusiastic individuals - we call this quality "vyazkost", literally "viscosity" - can find and follow animal tracks autonomously for hours/many kilometers. This is both good and bad, because it improves their productivity, but only if you can eventually catch up with them - sometimes, they begin barking too far away for you to hear them; they may leave in the afternoon and return next morning, and just by their looks you know they've had the time of their lives. Again, a Garmin collar is invaluable if you have a "viscous" laika.
Some people here add husky blood to the local laikas (huskies are very popular with the Khanty, mostly because of the good looks - blue eyes, nicer fur, etc.) but the result is often disappointing because huskies are prone to to running away and are way less interactive and manageable than laikas, and their hunting instincts are often messed up, especially because most huskies in Russia come from show lines (plus they are reluctant to give up their trophies and often just tear them apart or bury somewhere).

Re: Old Ski-Doo sleds revived by Russian company [Re: broncoformudv] #7197777
02/27/21 09:28 AM
02/27/21 09:28 AM
Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 5,119
Manitoba
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Northof50 Offline
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Northof50  Offline
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Joined: Dec 2008
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Manitoba
I hope your contributions here do not use up too much of your internet bytes.
Every fall the old Baba's would go out to collect the " percherytsi " fall mushrooms and it is always involving a " search and rescue " to find them because of memory loss with old age and they become disoriented. When the tracking dogs are used it looks like a ball going back in forth in a " pin-ball machine" as someone that can barely get around in their homes moves through the forest is revitalized.

Yes the disease that are in Ixodes ticks are just not being diagnosed with the new sampling methods. Another reason they do not use " naming them" from region first described like Lymes

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