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Re: Cottonwood? [Re: Dennis W] #7384907
10/21/21 08:09 PM
10/21/21 08:09 PM
Joined: Jan 2020
Posts: 2,032
Aliceville, Kansas
Yukon John Offline
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Yukon John  Offline
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Aliceville, Kansas
Originally Posted by Dennis W
If someone is gonna bring firewood to my house I'll take whatever they bring. You don't want him to pass on you next time when the wood is good.

This right here...if you don't care for it, pile it up and cook some wieners with your kids!


Act like a blank, get treated like a blank. Insert your own blank!
Re: Cottonwood? [Re: Providence Farm] #7384911
10/21/21 08:11 PM
10/21/21 08:11 PM
Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 10,683
Green County Wisconsin
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GREENCOUNTYPETE Offline
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GREENCOUNTYPETE  Offline
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Green County Wisconsin
if they drop it off burn it

it would make good outdoor camp fire wood

most of the time people want a camp fire that lasts and hour or so , not all night coals

if they are bringing your 3 foot in diameter logs , noodle them down to pieces you can lift


America only has one issue, we have a Responsibility crisis and everything else stems from it.
Re: Cottonwood? [Re: GREENCOUNTYPETE] #7384927
10/21/21 08:33 PM
10/21/21 08:33 PM
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 9,128
SWMo.
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tjm Offline
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tjm  Offline
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SWMo.
Originally Posted by GREENCOUNTYPETE

it has half the heat of oak for a cord

Yet it has almost exactly the same BTU per dry pound as red oak, if my math is right.

Re: Cottonwood? [Re: Providence Farm] #7384961
10/21/21 09:01 PM
10/21/21 09:01 PM
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 6,409
MN >>>
T-Rex Offline
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T-Rex  Offline
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I once read: Pound for pound perfectly dry wood all burns the same.

Yeah, a pound of cottonwood will be bigger than a pound of lots of other stuff, but, pound for pound.


Man who mistake shillelagh for fairy wand; see pixie dust, also.
Re: Cottonwood? [Re: Providence Farm] #7384985
10/21/21 09:39 PM
10/21/21 09:39 PM
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 9,128
SWMo.
T
tjm Offline
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SWMo.
Buy your dry wood by the ton and you'll never get cheated, buy it by the cord and that guy can stack 1/2 of it air. Split wood stacks to a greater volume than solid wood doesn't it, lots more air spaces?

Re: Cottonwood? [Re: Providence Farm] #7384993
10/21/21 09:59 PM
10/21/21 09:59 PM
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 14,627
Sandhills Nebraska
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Gary Benson Offline
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Sandhills Nebraska
Thats a fact tjm. There's guys asking 160 for a pickup load. Probly making 15 at McD dropping fries too.


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Re: Cottonwood? [Re: tjm] #7385002
10/21/21 10:05 PM
10/21/21 10:05 PM
Joined: Feb 2020
Posts: 2,610
Indiana
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Providence Farm Offline OP
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Providence Farm  Offline OP
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Posts: 2,610
Indiana
Originally Posted by tjm
Buy your dry wood by the ton and you'll never get cheated, buy it by the cord and that guy can stack 1/2 of it air. Split wood stacks to a greater volume than solid wood doesn't it, lots more air spaces?



I learned that when I was very young I got close to half a load more on a load bringing it home round instead of splitting it in the woods between less air space and being able to stack it much higher round.

Re: Cottonwood? [Re: Providence Farm] #7385019
10/21/21 10:38 PM
10/21/21 10:38 PM
Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 6,423
Alaska and Washington State
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waggler Offline
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Alaska and Washington State
Try smoking fish with punky dry cottonwood and you'll be pleasantly surprised.
If you want to use it for firewood, split it and let it dry for at least a year.
Mill some of it up for the boards that go around the top of dump truck dump boxes and you'll have a steady stream of return customers. It doesn't split up and bust like other lumber, it just sort of erodes away.


"I'm not skilled to understand"
Re: Cottonwood? [Re: nate] #7385029
10/21/21 10:52 PM
10/21/21 10:52 PM
Joined: May 2009
Posts: 10,411
Champaign County, Ohio.
K
KeithC Offline
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KeithC  Offline
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Joined: May 2009
Posts: 10,411
Champaign County, Ohio.
Originally Posted by nate
Originally Posted by KeithC
Cottonwood makes very good sheeting for barns. A friend of mine, who has a sawmill, sheets all of his barns with cottonwood. The advantage of cottonwood is that lots of tall wide trees are available. Once the wood is dry, it's very light weight and easy to hold in place while its being nailed. As long as you nail through the cottonwood, into a harder wood, it will stay in place. Cottonwood does not hold a nail well on its own.

Cottonwood makes good butts for thrown weapons such as spears, knives and axes. Almost all the thrown weapons events I have gone to use cottonwood. Weapons stick well and don't bounce back. Wet cottonwood can take a lot of abuse and the cuts close well when you pull the weapons out. Large rounds of cottonwood are typically free to cheap. If your sons like throwing weapons, you should mount a cottonwood butt for them,, about 4 feet high.

Keith


Keith
Are you talking outside sheeting? Or does it need siding over it? I figured it would rot in the weather, I've used it inside, if it dries you bout have to pre drill to drive a nail in it.


My friend James uses cottonwood as inside sheeting. Cottonwoods are the most common really big trees in our area and they have little commercial value to loggers. We both have some truly massive cottonwoods on our farms.

It is kind of pretty as sheeting. It's very pale, close to white and sometimes gets some faint lines reminiscent of tiger maple.

Keith

Re: Cottonwood? [Re: Providence Farm] #7385038
10/21/21 11:07 PM
10/21/21 11:07 PM
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 4,587
MN
M
Mark K Offline
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Mark K  Offline
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Posts: 4,587
MN
The indians used it for the fires inside their teepees because it doesn't pop when it burns. This means no surprise wake ups in the middle of the night to frantically remove a small cinder from your butt crack.

All wood is good enough for the fire ring. Plus, if you want to give camp wood away, cottonwood doesn't have diseases like elm and ash.

Re: Cottonwood? [Re: waggler] #7385043
10/21/21 11:25 PM
10/21/21 11:25 PM
Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 3,048
M.T.V. Alaska
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yukonjeff Offline
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M.T.V. Alaska
Originally Posted by waggler
Try smoking fish with punky dry cottonwood and you'll be pleasantly surprised.


The folks here use cottonwood for dry smoking salmon. Mild flavor, not harsh like alder can be.

I once tried it for smoked moose meat. It reminded me of dryfish too much.

Re: Cottonwood? [Re: Providence Farm] #7385049
10/21/21 11:58 PM
10/21/21 11:58 PM
Joined: Nov 2017
Posts: 23
West Siberia
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Tatiana Offline
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Tatiana  Offline
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Joined: Nov 2017
Posts: 23
West Siberia
Here, aspen and cottonwood are routinely used to clean brick stoves from resinous soot that forms when you use conifers for firewood, because they produce a very clean hot flame that burns down the sticky deposits. We also use them to make benches for banyas/saunas, because they stay cool to the touch even when it is very hot inside.

Re: Cottonwood? [Re: Providence Farm] #7385061
10/22/21 01:27 AM
10/22/21 01:27 AM
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 33,534
james bay frontierOnt.
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Boco Offline
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james bay frontierOnt.
I dont know what cottonwood is.I burn poplar and bam.Poplar burns good in the cabin when mixed with dry spruce in the fall.
Bam makes a quick hot fire in the skinning shed.Good to warm up the work area without cooking you out if your skinning shed is insulated.

Re: Cottonwood? [Re: Boco] #7385063
10/22/21 01:37 AM
10/22/21 01:37 AM
Joined: May 2009
Posts: 10,411
Champaign County, Ohio.
K
KeithC Offline
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Posts: 10,411
Champaign County, Ohio.
Originally Posted by Boco
I dont know what cottonwood is.I burn poplar and bam.Poplar burns good in the cabin when mixed with dry spruce in the fall.
Bam makes a quick hot fire in the skinning shed.Good to warm up the work area without cooking you out if your skinning shed is insulated.


Bam is probably balsam poplar. Cottonwood has much wider leaves. Both can be used to make Balm of Gilead. Cottonwood gets its name from the huge amount of white, cotton like fluff it produces to carry its tiny seeds. The seeds can travel really far on the wind. There's some cottonwoods across the state highway from me, probably seventy yards from where I garden and I still get hundreds of cottonwood trees in my garden every year. Cottonwood grows very fast, tall and straight in wet areas.

Some of the cottonwood trees in my low area are close to 5' in diameter. I have seen some that are well over 6' in diameter.

Keith

Re: Cottonwood? [Re: Providence Farm] #7385201
10/22/21 07:44 AM
10/22/21 07:44 AM
Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 5,236
Manitoba
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Northof50 Offline
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Manitoba
Boco you have to go to southern Ontario to get into cottonwood trees or onto the prairies where it is a riverbank habitat growing tree.
Tatiana interesting use of it in the saunas. Any pictures of it and this and this thread would light up like a Christmas tree

Homesteads that used it for lumber still stand, as long as it does not get wet it holds its strength.

Re: Cottonwood? [Re: tjm] #7385294
10/22/21 09:24 AM
10/22/21 09:24 AM
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 6,409
MN >>>
T-Rex Offline
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Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 6,409
MN >>>
Originally Posted by tjm
Buy your dry wood by the ton and you'll never get cheated, buy it by the cord and that guy can stack 1/2 of it air. Split wood stacks to a greater volume than solid wood doesn't it, lots more air spaces?

Cross stacking is a lot of work, to cheat a customer.

Just about any other configuration actually has a defined definition of volume a legal cord of 128 cu Ranging from 110 cu ft cut, not split, and neatly stacked to 175 cu ft "tossed".


Man who mistake shillelagh for fairy wand; see pixie dust, also.
Re: Cottonwood? [Re: Providence Farm] #7385326
10/22/21 10:01 AM
10/22/21 10:01 AM
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 7,452
ND
M
MJM Offline
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ND
Cotton wood is the biggest trees I ever seen beaver work on, in MT,ND and AK.
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Re: Cottonwood? [Re: Providence Farm] #7385332
10/22/21 10:12 AM
10/22/21 10:12 AM
Joined: Jan 2009
Posts: 1,590
Idaho, Lemhi County
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Gulo Offline
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Idaho, Lemhi County
Populus deltoides is the cottonwood we have here in the mountains of Idaho. Not my favorite for burning in the woodstove, as the ash content means you shovel out the stove almost daily. When punky, it does a great job of smoking fish. Also, I've used it for making canoe paddles, and it works very well.

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Re: Cottonwood? [Re: Providence Farm] #7385343
10/22/21 10:32 AM
10/22/21 10:32 AM
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 1,934
Alaska
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drasselt Offline
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Alaska
I've used it for stretchers. Takes push pins well. Early explorers preferred cottonwood and aspen over conifers for campfires since it doesn't pop and shoot sparks and tastes better than conifer smoke on cooked food. Beaver thrive on it.

Cottonwood (Poplar)

The cottonwood—also known as the poplar—is a tall tree with a spreading crown, named for its cotton-like seeds. The diverse poplar family includes the quaking aspen, which boasts the widest range of any North American tree, and the Plains cottonwood, which was the only tree many early settlers met as they forged westward through America's prairies. Today as in centuries past, the cottonwood offers welcome shade, as its powerful trunk divides into thick branches and opens into a spreading crown. Many cottonwoods grow from 70 to 100 feet tall, and the tree’s quick growth rate and adaptability to many soils and climates have made it an age-old friend to the American people.

The Cottonwood’s Place in History

Few sights were more welcome to America’s early pioneers than the cottonwood. As they pushed westward with their wagons, these brave men and women found food for their livestock in the tree's leaves, as well as shade for themselves and timber for their dwellings. The beauty of the cottonwood leaves as they turned in the wind may also have revived memories of eastern forests, and sustained many a flagging spirit. On the more practical side, cottonwood trunks provided dugout canoes, and the tree’s bark was used to produce both forage for horses and a bitter medicinal tea. And in regions with few trees, the very noticeable cottonwoods often served as gathering places and trail markers, and as sacred objects for several Plains tribes. Today, cottonwood is most commonly used in making plywood, matches, crates, boxes, and paper pulp.

Some Common Species

Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) is a slender, graceful tree, as attractive for its rounded mature crown and delicate branches as for its white bark and shimmering leaves. The “silver dollar” leaves, hanging from long, flexible leafstalks, turn in even the slightest breeze, reflecting light from their lustrous upper surface. This medium-sized tree, usually from 40 to 50 feet tall with a 20 to 30-foot spread, is found naturally in Alaska and lower California as well as from the New England states southward to Pennsylvania and westward to Missouri. It is valued for pulp production and for its role as one of the first trees to appear in areas that have been struck by fire and other natural disasters. But for many, the quaking aspen is just as valuable for its beauty, with its rustling leaves and striking white bark, growing along the sunny edges of America’s meadows and forests. (Grows in hardiness zones 1 to 7.)

The Plains cottonwood (Populus sargentii) has long been prized in the Great Plains states, where it was often the earliest and tallest tree to grow at the time of Western settlement. This attractive tree, which grows from 50 to 75 feet tall, is found throughout the Great Plains in locations with moist, low ground. It continues to be a source of shelter and shade across the region, building upon its legendary status as a friend to the early pioneers. (Grows in hardiness zones 3 to 9.)



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Re: Cottonwood? [Re: Providence Farm] #7385352
10/22/21 10:42 AM
10/22/21 10:42 AM
Joined: Oct 2011
Posts: 14,560
Wheaton Ks
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lee steinmeyer Online content
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Wheaton Ks
I've mixed it in my outside stove lots of time, and don't work bad at all. Burn some hardwood with it so you can level out a bed of coals to start the next burn. I have found that in an outside boiler, that wood selection doesn't sseem to make the burn last longer, it just varies the amount of coals for the next stoking. Split it and leave till next year if green, and mix.


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