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Biological Raccoon trait #6768761
02/13/20 12:49 PM
02/13/20 12:49 PM
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 4,188
SW Pa
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Bob Jameson Offline OP
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Bob Jameson  Offline OP
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Over the years I have closely observed some raccoons and a physical biological trait at least I know the males for sure exhibit. I am sure the females do this as well. However they are not as easily viewed for this observation due to their physical development which is hidden from easy examination view..

During the mating/rut time frame the males will drip small droplets of urine constantly from their baculum penile extension area. It runs down the fine hair extensions at the end of their baculum area and collects at the end sheath hair tips. Due to their low body profile and the hair extensions these droplets are easily deposited upon the grasses, ground and leaf clutter as they walk.

I have also observed them frequently rub their anal rectum area upon edges and corners of objects of a convenient height ever so briefly after toileting, eating or finding something that seems to interest them. I had to watch this behavior closely over time to see it and to understand what I was observing. Over time it was quite obvious in all animals observed. They were apparently using their anal gland and residual fecal deposits left on the rectum to deposit a slight amount of scent. Interesting behavior to see.

Acting very similar to the function of a deer scape dripper. I can only assume the multiple purposes of this constant dripping of urine for scent trailing back to their den site, following each others movements, keeping track of siblings or finding or trailing in heat females to name a few of the urine scent trail purposes. The anal rub deposit is just another way of marking and leaving more residual scent then just the urine alone.

Stands to reason. If you examine the anal area of a coon it is generally quite large. It also has wrinkles that hold traces of feces and anal gland excretions that are constantly released with each bowel movement. This scent most likely ferments becoming stronger over time in these skin wrinkles as bacteria develops in this waste build up area.

I have found little coon urine dribbled around a set can help promote more interest and more time at the set. Just like with many other animals urine and feces are the messages left, found and interpreted by other animals in their travels. The time of year obviously determines the importance and function of the urine DNA scent trail. Raccoon behavior takes on a different trait later in the season and they can be very indifferent as is known to some lure and bait presentations.

A few drops of lovage oil and some good asafoetida tincture added to some good coon urine can make a decent in - heat blend to play with on your next late season trapline for coon.

A small sturdy stick about 6 > 8 inches in height hammered into the ground about 12-15" from a DP with a dab of coon gland lure and urine squirt on top can sure help to promote interest beyond lure and bait in the late season. This will entice that coon to something that it does naturally every night on its travels.

Just some food for thought at this time of year. Not sure why I haven't posted this before. Maybe I did and don't remember. If I did sorry for the memory lapse. smile

Re: Biological Raccoon trait [Re: Bob Jameson] #6768769
02/13/20 12:56 PM
02/13/20 12:56 PM
Joined: Jan 2020
Posts: 99
Aliceville, Kansas
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Yukon John Offline
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Great info, thanks!

Re: Biological Raccoon trait [Re: Bob Jameson] #6768810
02/13/20 01:34 PM
02/13/20 01:34 PM
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 241
NE
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plainstrapping25 Offline
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Great observation. And thank you for passing it along

Re: Biological Raccoon trait [Re: Bob Jameson] #6769095
02/13/20 05:19 PM
02/13/20 05:19 PM
Joined: Dec 2015
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NNY
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080808 Offline
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Re: Biological Raccoon trait [Re: Bob Jameson] #6769203
02/13/20 06:15 PM
02/13/20 06:15 PM
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Northern Maine
Bruce T Offline
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Good information.Thanks for sharing.

Re: Biological Raccoon trait [Re: Bob Jameson] #6769217
02/13/20 06:23 PM
02/13/20 06:23 PM
Joined: Aug 2015
Posts: 293
NE NE
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Wife Offline
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I have seen something like this too Bob but I have another theory or two why this happens. Coon don't really hibernate by definition but during their "down time" in their den a lot of their bodily functions slow down and without drinking liquids for a period of time, I suspect their bladder can shrink from its normal elastic shape. When they are out and about in their late winter movements they are thirsty and drink or eat snow to keep going and their bladders can't hold much fluids so they are constantly dribbling until that elasticity comes back..... OR................... they have an enlarged prostate LOL...........................the mike

Re: Biological Raccoon trait [Re: Bob Jameson] #6769235
02/13/20 06:42 PM
02/13/20 06:42 PM
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Posts: 389
new york
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mike mason Offline
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Thanks, Bob. Your posts always have good info.

Re: Biological Raccoon trait [Re: Bob Jameson] #6769593
02/14/20 01:13 AM
02/14/20 01:13 AM
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Posts: 450
Ohio
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ZAC Offline
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Ohio
Many years ago I had a good friend in high school who had a pet raccoon. “Twiggy”. She lived in a large rabbit hutch cage in their backyard and was very tame. Late winter she would naturally come into season and draw lots of attention. My friend lived in the middle of nowhere open fields all around. Very few trees other than in their yard. Male suitors would come to twiggy’s pen chatter fight and hang around. These coons had to come from miles away. One instance my friend took a picture of 7 or 8 coons under on and around the cage tormenting his pet. I got the bright idea to try and start collecting her in heat urine. Unfortunately it never worked out and my friend lost his pet somewhere along the way.

Re: Biological Raccoon trait [Re: Bob Jameson] #6769604
02/14/20 01:32 AM
02/14/20 01:32 AM
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MN, USA
star flakes Offline
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Just sharing from Wiki:

Baculum
The baculum is a bone found in the penis of many placental mammals. It is absent in the human penis, but present in the penises of other primates, such as the gorilla and chimpanzee. The bone is located above the male urethra, and it aids sexual reproduction by maintaining sufficient stiffness during sexual penetration. The homologue to the baculum in female mammals is known as the baubellum or os clitoridis – a bone in the clitoris.

So an unanswered question is, does the baculum actually have a dual purpose as a lure dispenser in why God created it that way. As it serves in most of nature, except humans, as a.....baboon males service 100 females which explains the necessity of a bone, and why humans are one of the rare non herd or troop animals of one male only passing on genetics to a large female population.
It certainly would save energy in a Twiggy situation with numbers of males fighting for one female and wasting energy in the process.

Interesting observation by Mr. Jameson, not found in the biology classes.

Re: Biological Raccoon trait [Re: Bob Jameson] #6769683
02/14/20 07:28 AM
02/14/20 07:28 AM
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Allegany State Park area of NY
Archeryguy Offline
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Bob, it only makes sense. All animals need a method of locating each other, particularly in breeding season. Some species use vocal sounds, others use scent, some use both. I live in a huge wilderness area made up of hardwoods, conifers and some thickets in steep mountainous terrain. Raccoons are rarely concentrated in one particular type of habitat. You'll find them in the creek bottoms, the high ridges and everywhere in between. Leaving a trailing scent would seem to be a logical method of locating each other. How many times have we seen a family or group of raccoons traveling and foraging together. They must have a biological method of relocating each other when they separate in their travels. I know raccoons make vocal sounds but I think they would need to be fairly close to each to hear it.

Last edited by Archeryguy; 02/14/20 07:31 AM.
Re: Biological Raccoon trait [Re: Bob Jameson] #6769737
02/14/20 08:52 AM
02/14/20 08:52 AM
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SW Pa
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Bob Jameson Offline OP
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I am well aware and others that the baculum is the bone found in the penis that aides in the reproductive process. I didn't go into great detail with the physical biological urinary tract make up of the animal and might have been better to do that initially. The baculum I rationalized is generally a well known word by many trappers. I only chose to use that descriptive anatomical term in order to help some relate more easily to the general topic information and the body location area in reference.

The urethra is the basic internal biological pipeline conduit that routes the urine from the bladder to the penis for discharge or leakage purposes. This process of micro auto urine release obviously is a biological process that is triggered within the animal at this time of year and may very well be done year round.

I trust this clears up the reference to using the term baculum for future discussions on this topic. :

Re: Biological Raccoon trait [Re: Bob Jameson] #6769968
02/14/20 12:58 PM
02/14/20 12:58 PM
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Central MN
MNCedar Offline
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Excellent post. It makes total sense and there was no confusion.

I'm actually on the phone with a friend right now discussing the information shared by Jameson. We're already scheming!

Thank you!

Put this in the archives, please.

Last edited by MNCedar; 02/14/20 12:59 PM.
Re: Biological Raccoon trait [Re: Bob Jameson] #6770015
02/14/20 02:05 PM
02/14/20 02:05 PM
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Would someone guess that his dripping would be to lure a female back to his den , since she has the final say in the matter ?

Re: Biological Raccoon trait [Re: Bob Jameson] #6771169
02/15/20 01:09 PM
02/15/20 01:09 PM
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rogers city mi.
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jeff karsten Offline
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Bob Jameson thanks for an interesting post could this also correlate to large boars interest in coyote gland and urine


olden tyred
Re: Biological Raccoon trait [Re: Bob Jameson] #6771391
02/15/20 03:38 PM
02/15/20 03:38 PM
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SW Pa
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Bob Jameson Offline OP
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Coon have an interest in several types of gland lure and strong urines. Whether it is just over whelming curiosity or a territorial interest I am not sure. I know in late season coyote sets I catch my largest coons it seems on average. Some are caught well away from any cover also.

They seem to be roaming or traveling in search of something or just rambling along because they just want too. Lots of things trigger an animals motives at certain times of the season. Food, breeding urges and new denning areas all can be possible situations. Coons are very social at times and may be seeking out some company.

Re: Biological Raccoon trait [Re: Golf ball] #6771986
02/16/20 12:42 AM
02/16/20 12:42 AM
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Aliceville, Kansas
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Yukon John Offline
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Originally Posted by Golf ball
Would someone guess that his dripping would be to lure a female back to his den , since she has the final say in the matter ?


Lol, maybe I should try that at home!

Re: Biological Raccoon trait [Re: Yukon John] #6777499
02/20/20 06:06 PM
02/20/20 06:06 PM
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East-Central Wisconsin
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bblwi Online content
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Thank you Bob for the insights. I would like to add some thoughts I have and see what others have as to thoughts as well.
The idea that the raccoon maybe mostly males dribble urine (probably hormonal in process) is most likely very correct. This way as stated they can lay down scent trails and they can revisit those trails periodically. The females when they come out periodically may well interface with these scent trails and when males pass through they can smell the females and maybe even which ones are coming into estrus. Males can make one or several such trails and several males may travel these as well. This may be one reason why several males may be at a den site with one estrus female and fighting to mate with her.
The dribbling of urine can use up lots of water and thus dehydration can occur and one reason why the coons seem so attracted to water during this period and not so much food. The females estrus cycle may cause them to move as well and also head to water. It seems to make sense that coons have a mating system that coordinates the finding of mating females and rutting males and not just some random wandering and finding females in dens.

Bryce

Re: Biological Raccoon trait [Re: Bob Jameson] #6778534
02/21/20 05:09 PM
02/21/20 05:09 PM
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SW Pa
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Bob Jameson Offline OP
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Bryce I am sure the urine droplet release and anal rubbing of its rectum on nearby objects serves several purposes as you have stated. Through my experience and observations over the years I am inclined to agree with your assessment. Time of year I believe causes this urinary depositing trait to be used by the coon in the most productive way to their benefit.

The animals seasonal hormonal changes all fit into their routine for the breeding/mating season. Both male and female leave their own distinct odor and eventual rut and in heat hormonal scent trails when the time is right. That is one of the traits that can give a trapper a much better edge when this is going on and food isn't a number one priority.

Understanding some of these traits can make us all better trappers particularly in the later part of the season when the hay days of trapping numbers has passed.

Re: Biological Raccoon trait [Re: Bob Jameson] #6782608
02/25/20 12:13 PM
02/25/20 12:13 PM
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SW Pa
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Bob Jameson Offline OP
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Another behavior not commonly known is the frequent anal rubbing upon objects close to the ground. Those objects and edges 6-8inches or so high that are easily reached and backed into while spending time in a feeding area or toilet area or just marking its territory to leave their calling card so to speak.

Re: Biological Raccoon trait [Re: Bob Jameson] #6782790
02/25/20 03:28 PM
02/25/20 03:28 PM
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centrel PA
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Kevin Colpetzer Offline
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Elk, also dribble urine during the rut.

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